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Job 7:10

    Job 7:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He shall return no more to his house, neither shall his place know him any more.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He shall return no more to his house, neither shall his place know him any more.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    He shall return no more to his house, Neither shall his place know him any more.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    He will not come back to his house, and his place will have no more knowledge of him.

    Webster's Revision

    He shall return no more to his house, Neither shall his place know him any more.

    World English Bible

    He shall return no more to his house, neither shall his place know him any more.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    He shall return no more to his house, neither shall his place know him any more.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 7:10

    He shall return no more to his house, neither shall his place know him any more - He does not mean that he shall be annihilated but that he shall never more become an inhabitant of the earth. The word שאול, which we properly enough translate grave, here signifies also the state of the dead, hades, and sometimes any deep pit, or even hell itself.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 7:10

    He shall return no more to his house - He shall not revisit his family. Job is dwelling on the calamity of death, and one of the circumstances most deeply felt in the prospect of death is, that a man must leave his own house to return no more. The stately palaces that he has built; the splendid halls which he has adorned; the chamber where he slept; the cheerful fireside where he met his family; the place at the table which he occupied, he will revisit no more. His tread will be no more heard; his voice will no more awaken delight in the happy family group; the father and husband returning from his daily toil will no more give pleasure to the joyous circle. Such is death. It removes us from all earthly comforts, takes us away from home and kindred - from children and friends, and bids us go alone to an unknown world. Job felt that it was a sad and gloomy thing. And so it is, unless there is a well-founded hope of a better world. It is the gospel only that can make us willing to leave our happy dwellings, and the embraces of kindred and friends, and to tread the lonely path to the regions of the dead. The friend of God has a brighter home in heaven. He has more numerous and better friends there. He has there a more splendid and happy mansion than any here on earth. He will be engaged in more blissful scenes there, than can be enjoyed by the most happy fireside here; will have more cheerful employments there, than any which can be found on earth; and will have higher and purer pleasures there, than can be found in parks, and lawns, and landscapes; in splendid halls, in music, and the festive board; in literary pursuits, and in the love of kindred. How far Job had the means of consolation from such reflections as these, it is not easy now to determine. The probability, however, is, that his views were comparatively dim and obscure.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 7:10

    7:10 Any more - He shall no more be seen and known in his former habitation. It concerns us to secure a better place when we die: for this will own us no more.
    Book: Job