Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Job 9:15

    Job 9:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Whom, though I were righteous, yet would I not answer, but I would make supplication to my judge.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Whom, though I were righteous, yet would I not answer, but I would make supplication to my judge.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Whom, though I were righteous, yet would I not answer; I would make supplication to my judge.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Even if my cause was good, I would not be able to give an answer; I would make request for grace from him who was against me.

    Webster's Revision

    Whom, though I were righteous, yet would I not answer; I would make supplication to my judge.

    World English Bible

    Though I were righteous, yet I wouldn't answer him. I would make supplication to my judge.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Whom, though I were righteous, yet would I not answer; I would make supplication to mine adversary.

    Definitions for Job 9:15

    Supplication - Petition; an expression of need.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 9:15

    Though I were righteous - Though clear of all the crimes, public and secret, of which you accuse me, yet I would not dare to stand before his immaculate holiness. Man's holiness may profit man, but in the sight of the infinite purity of God it is nothing. Thus sung an eminent poet: -

    "I loathe myself when God I see,And into nothing fall;

    Content that thou exalted be,And Christ be all in all."

    I would make supplication to my Judge - Though not conscious of any sin, I should not think myself thereby justified; but would, from a conviction of the exceeding breadth of the commandment, and the limited nature of my own perfection, cry out, "Cleanse thou me from secret faults!"

    Barnes' Notes on Job 9:15

    Whom, though I were righteous - That is, if I felt the utmost confidence that I was righteous, yet, if God judged otherwise, and regarded me as a sinner, I would not reply to him, but would make supplication to him as a sinner. I would have so much confidence in him, and would feel that he was so much better qualified than I am to judge, and that I am so liable to be deceived, that I would come to him as a sinner, if he judged and declared me to be one, and would plead for pardon. The meaning is, that God is a much better judge of our character than we can possibly be, and that his regarding us as sinners is the highest proof that we are such, whatever may be our views to the contrary. This shows the extent of the confidence which Job had in God and is an indication of true piety. And it is founded in reason as well as in piety. Men often suppose that they are righteous, and yet they know that God adjudges otherwise, and regards them as sinners. He offers them pardon as sinners. He threatens to punish them as sinners. The question is, whether they shall act on their own feelings and judgment in the case, or on his? Shall they adhere obstinately to their views, and refuse to yield to God, or shall they act on the truth of his declarations? Now that Job was right in his views of the case, may appear from the following considerations.

    (1) God knows the heart. He cannot be deceived; we may be. In nothing are we more liable to be deceived than in regard to our own character. We should, therefore, distrust our own judgment in this case, but we should never distrust God.

    (2) God is infinitely benevolent, and will not judge unkindly. He has no wish to find us sinners; he will have no pleasure in making us out to be transgressors. A heart of infinite benevolence would prefer to find all people holy, and would look on every favorable circumstance in the case with all the kindness which it would deserve. No being would be so likely to make a favorable decision in our case as the infinitely benevolent God; none would so delight to find that we were free from the charge of guilt.

    (3) God will act on his own views of our character, and not on ours; and it is prudent and wise, therefore, for us to act on his views now. He will judge us in the last day according to his estimate of our character, and not according to the estimate which we may form.

    (4) At the same time, we cannot but accord with his views of our own character. Our reason and conscience tell us that we have violated his laws, and that we have no claim to his mercy. No man can persuade himself that he is wholly righteous; and being conscious of guilt, though in the slightest degree, he should make supplication to his Judge.
    Book: Job