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John 11:11

    John 11:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    These things said he: and after that he saith unto them, Our friend Lazarus sleepeth; but I go, that I may awake him out of sleep.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    These things said he: and after that he said to them, Our friend Lazarus sleeps; but I go, that I may awake him out of sleep.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    These things spake he: and after this he saith unto them, Our friend Lazarus is fallen asleep; but I go, that I may awake him out of sleep.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    These things said he: and after that he said to them, Lazarus our friend is at rest; but I go so that I may make him come out of his sleep.

    Webster's Revision

    These things spake he: and after this he saith unto them, Our friend Lazarus is fallen asleep; but I go, that I may awake him out of sleep.

    World English Bible

    He said these things, and after that, he said to them, "Our friend, Lazarus, has fallen asleep, but I am going so that I may awake him out of sleep."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    These things spake he: and after this he saith unto them, Our friend Lazarus is fallen asleep; but I go, that I may awake him out of sleep.

    Clarke's Commentary on John 11:11

    Lazarus sleepeth - It was very common among the Jews to express death by sleep; and the expression, falling asleep - sleeping with their fathers, etc., were in great use among them. The Hebrews probably used this form of speech to signify their belief in the immortality of the soul, and the resurrection of the body.

    It is certain that our Lord received no intimation of Lazarus's death from any person, and that he knew it through that power by which he knows all things.

    Barnes' Notes on John 11:11

    Lazarus sleepeth - Is dead. The word "sleep" is applied to death,

    1. Because of the resemblance between them, as sleep is the "kinsman of death." In this sense it is often used by pagan writers.

    2. However, in the Scriptures it is used to intimate that death will not be final: that there will be an awaking out of this sleep, or a resurrection. It is a beautiful and tender expression, removing all that is dreadful in death, and filling the mind with the idea of calm repose after a life of toil, with a reference to a future resurrection in increased vigor and renovated powers. In this sense it is applied in the Scriptures usually to the saints, 1 Corinthians 11:30; 1 Corinthians 15:51; 1 Thessalonians 4:14; 1 Thessalonians 5:10; Matthew 9:24.

    Wesley's Notes on John 11:11

    11:11 Our friend Lazarus sleepeth - This he spoke, just when he died. Sleepeth - Such is the death of good men in the language of heaven. But the disciples did not yet understand this language. And the slowness of our understanding makes the Scripture often descend to our barbarous manner of speaking.