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John 2:11

    John 2:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    This beginning of miracles did Jesus in Cana of Galilee, and manifested forth his glory; and his disciples believed on him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    This beginning of miracles did Jesus in Cana of Galilee, and manifested forth his glory; and his disciples believed on him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    This beginning of his signs did Jesus in Cana of Galilee, and manifested his glory; and his disciples believed on him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    This, the first of his signs, Jesus did at Cana in Galilee and let his glory be seen openly; and his disciples put their faith in him.

    Webster's Revision

    This beginning of his signs did Jesus in Cana of Galilee, and manifested his glory; and his disciples believed on him.

    World English Bible

    This beginning of his signs Jesus did in Cana of Galilee, and revealed his glory; and his disciples believed in him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    This beginning of his signs did Jesus in Cana of Galilee, and manifested his glory; and his disciples believed on him.

    Clarke's Commentary on John 2:11

    This beginning of miracles - It was probably the first he ever wrought: - at any rate, it was the first he wrought after his baptism, and the first he wrought publicly.

    His glory - His supreme Divinity: John 1:14.

    His disciples believed on him - Were more abundantly confirmed in their faith, that he was either the promised Messiah, or a most extraordinary prophet, in the fullest intercourse with the ever blessed God.

    Barnes' Notes on John 2:11

    This beginning of miracles - This his first public miracle. This is declared by the sacred writer to be a "miracle" - that is, an exertion of divine power, producing a change of the substance of water into wine, which no human power could do.

    Manifested forth - Showed; exhibited.

    His glory - His power, and proper character as the Messiah; showed that he had divine power, and that God had certainly commissioned him. This is shown to be a real miracle by the following considerations:

    1. Real water was placed in the vessels. This the servants believed, and there was no possibility of deception.

    2. The water was placed where it was not customary to keep wine. It could not be pretended that it was merely a mixture of water and wine.

    3. It was judged to be wine without knowing whence it came. There was no agreement between Jesus and the governor of the feast to impose on the guests.

    4. It was a change which nothing but divine power could effect. He that can change water into a substance like the juice of the grape must be clothed with divine power.

    Believed on him - This does not mean that they did not believe on him beforehand, but that their faith was confirmed or strengthened. They saw a miracle, and it satisfied them that he was the Messiah. "Before this" they "believed" on the testimony of John, and from conversation with Jesus John 1:35-51; now they saw that he was invested with almighty power, and their faith was established.

    From this narrative we may learn:

    1. That marriage is honorable, and that Jesus, if sought, will not refuse his presence and blessing on such an occasion.

    2. On such an occasion the presence and approbation of Christ should be sought. No compact formed on earth is more important; none enters so deeply into our comfort in this world; perhaps none will so much affect our destiny in the world to come. It should be entered into, then, in the fear of God.

    3. On all such occasions, our conduct should be such that the presence of Jesus would be no interruption or disturbance. He is holy. He is always present in every place; and on all festival occasions our deportment should be such as that we should welcome the presence of the Lord Jesus Christ. "That is not a proper stale of feeling or employment which would be interrupted by the presence of the Saviour."

    4. Jesus delighted to do good. In the very beginning of his ministry he worked a miracle to show his benevolence. This was the appropriate commencement of a life in which he was to go about doing good. He seized every opportunity of doing it; and at a marriage feast, as well as among the sick and poor, he showed the character which he always sustained - that of a benefactor of mankind.

    5. An argument cannot be drawn from this instance in favor of intemperate drinking. There is no evidence that any who were present on that occasion drank too freely.

    continued...

    Wesley's Notes on John 2:11

    2:11 And his disciples believed - More steadfastly.
    Book: John
    Topic: Miracles