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John 7:26

    John 7:26 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But, lo, he speaketh boldly, and they say nothing unto him. Do the rulers know indeed that this is the very Christ?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But, see, he speaks boldly, and they say nothing to him. Do the rulers know indeed that this is the very Christ?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And lo, he speaketh openly, and they say nothing unto him. Can it be that the rulers indeed know that this is the Christ?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And here he is talking openly and they say nothing to him! Is it possible that the rulers have knowledge that this is truly the Christ?

    Webster's Revision

    And lo, he speaketh openly, and they say nothing unto him. Can it be that the rulers indeed know that this is the Christ?

    World English Bible

    Behold, he speaks openly, and they say nothing to him. Can it be that the rulers indeed know that this is truly the Christ?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And lo, he speaketh openly, and they say nothing unto him. Can it be that the rulers indeed know that this is the Christ?

    Clarke's Commentary on John 7:26

    That this is the very Christ? - In most of the common printed editions αληθως is found, the Very Christ; but the word is wanting in BDKLTX, twenty-two others, several editions; all the Arabic, Wheelock's Persic, the Coptic, Sahidic, Armenian, Slavonic, Vulgate, and all the Itala but one, Origen, Epiphanius, Cyril, Isidore, Pelusian, and Nonnus. Grotius, Mill, Bengel, and Griesbach, decide against it. Bishop Pearce says, I am of opinion that this second αληθως, in this verse, should be omitted, it seeming quite unnecessary, if not inaccurate, when the words αληθως εγνωσαν, had just preceded it.

    Calmet observes that the multitude which heard our Lord at this time was composed of three different classes of persons:

    1. The rulers, priests, and Pharisees, declared enemies of Christ.

    2. The inhabitants of Jerusalem, who knew the sentiments of their rulers concerning him.

    3. The strangers, who from different quarters had come up to Jerusalem to the feast, and who heard Christ attentively, being ignorant of the designs of the rulers, etc., against him.

    Our Lord addresses himself in this discourse principally to his enemies. The strange Jews were those who were astonished when Christ said, John 7:20, that they sought to kill him, having no such design themselves, and not knowing that others had. And the Jews of Jerusalem were those who, knowing the disposition of the rulers, and seeing Christ speak openly, no man attempting to seize him, addressed each other in the foregoing words, Do the rulers know indeed that this is the Christ? imagining that the chief priests, etc., had at last been convinced that Jesus was the Messiah.

    Barnes' Notes on John 7:26

    Do the rulers know indeed ... - It seems from this that they supposed that the rulers had been convinced that Jesus was the Messiah, but that from some cause they were not willing yet to make it known to the people. The reasons of this opinion were these:

    1. They knew that they had attempted to kill him.

    2. They now saw him speaking boldly to the people without interruption from the rulers.

    They concluded, therefore, that some change had taken place in the sentiments of the rulers in regard to him, though they had not yet made it public.

    The rulers - The members of the Sanhedrin, or great council of the nation, who had charge of religious affairs.

    Indeed - Truly; certainly. Have they certain evidence, as would appear from their suffering him to speak without interruption?

    The very Christ - Is truly or really the Messiah.