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Joshua 9:5

    Joshua 9:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And old shoes and clouted upon their feet, and old garments upon them; and all the bread of their provision was dry and mouldy.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And old shoes and clouted on their feet, and old garments on them; and all the bread of their provision was dry and moldy.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and old and patched shoes upon their feet, and old garments upon them; and all the bread of their provision was dry and was become mouldy.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And put old stitched-up shoes on their feet, and old clothing on their backs; and all the food they had with them was dry and broken up.

    Webster's Revision

    and old and patched shoes upon their feet, and old garments upon them; and all the bread of their provision was dry and was become mouldy.

    World English Bible

    and old and patched shoes on their feet, and wore old garments. All the bread of their provision was dry and moldy.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and old shoes and clouted upon their feet, and old garments upon them; and all the bread of their provision was dry and was become mouldy.

    Clarke's Commentary on Joshua 9:5

    Old shoes and clouted - Their sandals, they pretended had been worn out by long and difficult travelling, and they had been obliged to have them frequently patched during the way; their garments also were worn thin; and what remained of their bread was mouldy - spotted with age, or, as our old version has it, bored - pierced with many holes by the vermin which had bred in it, through the length of the time it had been in their sacks; and this is the most literal meaning of the original נקדים nikkudim, which means spotted or pierced with many holes. The old and clouted shoes have been a subject of some controversy: the Hebrew word בלות baloth signifies worn out, from בלה balah, to wear away; and מטלאות metullaoth, from טלא tala, to spot or patch, i.e., spotted with patches. Our word clouted, in the Anglo-Saxon signifies seamed up, patched; from clout, rag, or small piece of cloth, used for piecing or patching. But some suppose the word here comes from clouet, the diminutive of clou, a small nail, with which the Gibeonites had fortified the soles of their shoes, to prevent them from wearing out in so long a journey; but this seems very unlikely; and our old English term clouted - seamed or patched - expresses the spirit of the Hebrew word.