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Luke 11:37

    Luke 11:37 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And as he spake, a certain Pharisee besought him to dine with him: and he went in, and sat down to meat.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And as he spoke, a certain Pharisee sought him to dine with him: and he went in, and sat down to meat.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Now as he spake, a Pharisee asketh him to dine with him: and he went in, and sat down to meat.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now, while he was talking, a Pharisee made a request that he would come to a meal with him; and he went in and took his seat at the meal.

    Webster's Revision

    Now as he spake, a Pharisee asketh him to dine with him: and he went in, and sat down to meat.

    World English Bible

    Now as he spoke, a certain Pharisee asked him to dine with him. He went in, and sat at the table.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Now as he spake, a Pharisee asketh him to dine with him: and he went in, and sat down to meat.

    Definitions for Luke 11:37

    Besought - Entreated; asked; called.
    Meat - Food.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 11:37

    To dine - Ὁπως αριϚηση. The word αριστειν dignifies the first eating of the day. The Jews made but two meals in the day; their αριστον may be called their breakfast or their dinner, because it was both, and was but a slight meal. Their chief meal was their δειπνον or supper, after the heat of the day was over; and the same was the principal meal among the Greeks and Romans. Josephus, in his Life, says, sect. 54, that the legal hour of the αριστον, on the Sabbath, was the sixth hour, or at twelve o'clock at noon, as we call it. What the hour was on the other days of the week, he does not say; but probably it was much the same. Bishop Pearce.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 11:37

    And as he spake - While he was addressing the people, and particularly while he was reproving that generation and declaring its crimes.

    A certain Pharisee - The Pharisees had been particularly referred to in the discourse of the Saviour recorded in the previous verses. This one, perhaps, having felt particularly the force of the remarks of Jesus, and being desirous of being alone with him, invited him to go home with him. There is little doubt that this was for the purpose of drawing him away from the people; that he did it with a malignant intention, perhaps with a design to confute Jesus in private, or to reprove him for thus condemning the whole nation as he did. He might have seen that those who attacked Jesus "publicly" were commonly unsuccessful, and he desired. probably, to encounter him more privately.

    Besought him - Asked him.

    To dine with him - The Jews, as well as the Greeks and Romans, had but two principal meals. The first was a slight repast, and was taken about ten or eleven o'clock of our time, and consisted chiefly of fruit, milk, cheese, etc. The second meal was partaken of about three o'clock P. M., and was their principal meal. The "first" is the one here intended.

    He went in - Though he knew the evil design of the Pharisee, yet he did not decline the invitation. He knew that it might afford him an opportunity to do good. These two things are to be observed in regard to our Saviour's conduct in such matters:

    1. That he did not decline an invitation to dine with a man simply because he was a Pharisee, or because he was a wicked man. Hence, he was charged with being gluttonous, and a friend of publicans and sinners, Matthew 11:19.

    2. He seized upon all occasions to do good. He never shrank from declaring the truth, and making such occasions the means of spreading the gospel. If Christians and Christian ministers would follow the example of the Saviour always, they would avoid all scandal, and might do even in such places a vast amount of good.

    Sat down - Reclined at the table. See the notes at Matthew 23:6.