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Luke 15:16

    Luke 15:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave to him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And so great was his need that he would have been glad to take the pigs' food, and no one gave him anything.

    Webster's Revision

    And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him.

    World English Bible

    He wanted to fill his belly with the husks that the pigs ate, but no one gave him any.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And he would fain have been filled with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him.

    Definitions for Luke 15:16

    Fain - To desire earnestly; long for.
    Swine - Pigs.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 15:16

    With the husks - Κερατιων. Bochart, I think, has proved that κερατια does not mean husks: to signify which the Greek botanical writers use the word λοβοι; several examples of which he gives from Theophrastus. He shows, also, that the original word means the fruit of the ceratonia or charub tree, which grows plentifully in Syria. This kind of pulse, Columella observes, was made use of to feed swine. See Bochart, Hieroz. lib. ii. cap. lvi. col. 707-10.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 15:16

    He would fain - He would gladly. He desired to do it.

    The husks - The word "husks" with us denotes the outward covering of grain. In this there is little nourishment, and it is evident that this is not intended here; but the word used here denotes not only "husks," but also leguminous plants, as beans, etc. It is also used to denote the fruit of a tree called the "carob or kharub-tree," which is common in Ionia, Syria, and Rhodes. The tree is more bushy and thick set than the apple tree, and the leaves are larger and of a much darker green. The following is Dr. Thomson's description of the fruit of this tree ("The Land and the Book," vol. i. p. 22): "The 'husks' - a mistranslation - are fleshy pods, somewhat like those of the locust-tree, from six to ten inches long and one broad, laid inside with a gelatinous substance, not wholly unpleasant to the taste when thoroughly ripe. I have seen large orchards of this kharub in Cyprus, where it is still the food which the swine do eat. The kharub is often called John's Bread, and also Locust-tree, from a mistaken idea about the food of the Baptist in the wilderness." The cut will give an idea of these "pods," or "husks," as they are called in our translation.

    No man gave unto him - Some have understood this as meaning "no one gave him anything - any bread or provisions;" but the connection requires us to understand it of the "husks." He did not go a begging - his master was bound to provide for his wants; but the provision which he made for him was so poor that he would have preferred the food of the swine. He desired a portion of "their food," but that was not given him. A certain quantity was measured out for "them," and "he" was not at liberty to eat it himself. Nothing could more strikingly show the evil of his condition, or the deep degradation, and pollution, and wretchedness of sin.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 15:16

    15:16 He would fain have filled his belly with the husks - He would fain have satisfied himself with worldly comforts. Vain, fruitless endeavour!