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Luke 16:14

    Luke 16:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the Pharisees also, who were covetous, heard all these things: and they derided him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the Pharisees also, who were covetous, heard all these things: and they derided him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the Pharisees, who were lovers of money, heard all these things; and they scoffed at him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the Pharisees, who had a great love of money, hearing these things, were making sport of him.

    Webster's Revision

    And the Pharisees, who were lovers of money, heard all these things; and they scoffed at him.

    World English Bible

    The Pharisees, who were lovers of money, also heard all these things, and they scoffed at him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the Pharisees, who were lovers of money, heard all these things; and they scoffed at him.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 16:14

    They derided him - Or rather, They treated him with the utmost contempt. So we may translate the original words εξεμυκτηριζον αυτον, which literally signifies, in illum emunxerunt - but must not be translated into English, unless, to come a little near it, we say, they turned up their noses at him; and why! Because they were lovers of money, and he showed them that all such were in danger of perdition. As they were wedded to this life, and not concerned for the other, they considered him one of the most absurd and foolish of men, and worthy only of the most sovereign contempt, because he taught that spiritual and eternal things should be preferred before the riches of the universe. And how many thousands are there of the very same sentiment to the present day!

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 16:14

    They derided him - The fact that they were "covetous" is here stated as the reason why they derided him, or, as it is literally, "they turned up the nose at him." They contemned or despised the doctrine which he had laid down, probably because it showed them that with their love of money they could not be the true friends of God, or that their profession of religion was really false and hollow. They were "attempting" to serve God and mammon, and they, therefore, looked upon his doctrine with contempt and scorn.

    Justify yourselves - "Attempt" to appear just; or; you aim to appear righteous in the sight of people, and do not regard the heart.

    That which is highly esteemed - That is, mere external works, or actions performed merely to "appear" to be righteous.

    Is abomination - Is abominable, or hateful. The word used here is the one that in the Old Testament is commonly given to "idols," and denotes God's "abhorrence" of such conduct. These words are to be applied "chiefly" to what Jesus was discoursing about. There are many things esteemed among people which are "not" abomination in the sight of God; as, for example, truth, parental and filial affection, industry, etc. But many things, much sought and admired, "are" hateful in his sight. The love of wealth and show, ambition and pride, frivolous and splendid vices, and all the wickedness that people contrive to "gild" and to make appear like virtue - external acts that "appear" well while the heart is evil - are abominable in the sight of God, and "should be" in the sight of people. Compare Luke 18:11-14; 1 Samuel 16:7.