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Luke 16:4

    Luke 16:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I am resolved what to do, that, when I am put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I am resolved what to do, that, when I am put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I am resolved what to do, that, when I am put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I have come to a decision what to do, so that when I am put out of my position they will take me into their houses.

    Webster's Revision

    I am resolved what to do, that, when I am put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.

    World English Bible

    I know what I will do, so that when I am removed from management, they may receive me into their houses.'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I am resolved what to do, that, when I am put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 16:4

    They may receive me - That is, the debtors and tenants, who paid their debts and rents, not in money, but in kind; such as wheat, oil, and other produce of their lands.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 16:4

    I am resolved - He thought of his condition. He looked at the plans which occurred to him. He had been dishonest, and knew that he must lose his place. It would have been better to have "considered before this," and resolved on a proper course of life, and to be faithful to his trust; and his perplexity here teaches us that dishonesty will sooner or later lead us into difficulty, and that the path of honesty is not only the "right" path, but is the path that is filled with most comfort and peace.

    When I am put out ... - When I lose my place, and have no home and means of support.

    They may receive me ... - Those who are now under me, and whom I am resolved now to favor. He had been dishonest to his master, and, having "commenced" a course of dishonesty, he did not shrink from pursuing it. Having injured his master, and being now detected, he was willing still farther to injure him, to take revenge on him for removing him from his place, and to secure his own interest still at his expense. He was resolved to lay these persons under such obligations, and to show them so much kindness, that they could not well refuse to return the kindness to him and give him a support. We may learn here,

    1. That one sin leads on to another, and that one act of dishonesty will be followed by many more, if there is opportunity.

    2. Men who commit one sin cannot get along "consistently" without committing many more. One lie will demand many more to make it "appear" like the truth, and one act of cheating will demand many more to avoid detection. The beginning of sin is like the letting out of waters, and no man knows, if he indulges in one sin, where it will end.

    3. Sinners are selfish. They care more about "themselves" than they do either about God or truth. If they seek salvation, it is only for selfish ends, and because they desire a comfortable "abode" in the future world rather than because they have any regard to God or his cause.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 16:4

    16:4 I know - That is, I am resolved, what to do.