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Luke 18:3

    Luke 18:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And there was a widow in that city; and she came to him, saying, Avenge me of my adversary.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and there was a widow in that city; and she came oft unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And there was a widow in that town, and she kept on coming to him and saying, Give me my right against the man who has done me wrong.

    Webster's Revision

    and there was a widow in that city; and she came oft unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.

    World English Bible

    A widow was in that city, and she often came to him, saying, 'Defend me from my adversary!'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and there was a widow in that city; and she came oft unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 18:3

    Avenge me of mine adversary - The original, εκδικησον με απο του αντιδικου μου, had better be translated, Do me justice against, or vindicate me from, my adversary. If the woman had come to get revenge, as our common translation intimates, I think our blessed Lord would never have permitted her to have the honor of a place in the sacred records. She desired to have justice, and that only; and by her importunity she got that which the unrighteous judge had no inclination to give, but merely for his own ease.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 18:3

    A widow - This is a circumstance that gives increasing interest to the parable. Judges were bound to show special attention to widows, Isaiah 1:17; Jeremiah 22:3. The reason of this was that they were defenseless, were commonly poor, and were liable to be oppressed by those in power.

    Avenge me - This would have been better translated, "Do me justice against my adversary, or vindicate me from him." It does not denote vengeance or revenge, but simply that she wished to have "justice" done her - a thing which this judge was "bound" to do, but which it seems he had no disposition to do.

    Adversary - One opposed in law. In this case it seems that the judge was unwilling to do justice, and probably took advantage of her condition to oppress her.