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Mark 16:1

    Mark 16:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And when the sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome, had bought sweet spices, that they might come and anoint him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And when the sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome, had bought sweet spices, that they might come and anoint him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And when the sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome, bought spices, that they might come and anoint him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And when the Sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene and Mary, the mother of James, and Salome, got spices, so that they might come and put them on him.

    Webster's Revision

    And when the sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome, bought spices, that they might come and anoint him.

    World English Bible

    When the Sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome, bought spices, that they might come and anoint him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And when the sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome, bought spices, that they might come and anoint him.

    Definitions for Mark 16:1

    Anoint - To rub in; rub on.
    Sabbath - A rest; cessation from work.

    Clarke's Commentary on Mark 16:1

    And anoint him - Rather, to embalm him. This is a proof that they had not properly understood what Christ had so frequently spoken, viz. that he would rise again the third day. And this inattention or unbelief of theirs is a proof of the truth of the resurrection.

    Barnes' Notes on Mark 16:1

    See this passage explained in the notes at Matthew 28:1-8.

    Mark 16:1

    Sweet spices - "Aromatics." Substances used in embalming. The idea of sweetness is not, however, implied in the original. Many of the substances used for embalming were "bitter" - as, for example, myrrh - and none of them, perhaps, could properly be called "sweet." The word "spices" expresses all that there is in the original.

    Anoint him - Embalm him, or apply these spices to his body to keep it from putrefaction. This is proof that they did not suppose he would rise again; and the fact that they did not "expect" he would rise, gives more strength to the evidence for his resurrection.

    Wesley's Notes on Mark 16:1

    16:1 Mt 28:1; Lu 24:1; John 20:1.