Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Matthew 12:13

    Matthew 12:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then saith he to the man, Stretch forth thine hand. And he stretched it forth; and it was restored whole, like as the other.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then said he to the man, Stretch forth your hand. And he stretched it forth; and it was restored whole, like as the other.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Then saith he to the man, Stretch forth thy hand. And he stretched it forth; and it was restored whole, as the other.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then said he to the man, Put out your hand. And he put it out, and it was made as well as the other.

    Webster's Revision

    Then saith he to the man, Stretch forth thy hand. And he stretched it forth; and it was restored whole, as the other.

    World English Bible

    Then he told the man, "Stretch out your hand." He stretched it out; and it was restored whole, just like the other.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Then saith he to the man, Stretch forth thy hand. And he stretched it forth; and it was restored whole, as the other.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 12:13

    Stretch forth thine hand - The bare command of God is a sufficient reason of obedience. This man might have reasoned thus: "Lord, my hand is withered; how then can I stretch it out? Make it whole first, and afterwards I will do as thou commandest." This may appear reasonable, but in his case it would have been foolishness. At the command of the Lord he made the effort, and in making it the cure was effected! Faith disregards apparent impossibilities, where there is a command and promise of God. The effort to believe is, often, that faith by which the soul is healed.

    A little before (Matthew 12:6, Matthew 12:8) Jesus Christ had asserted his Godhead, in this verse he proves it. What but the omnipotence of the living God could have, in a moment, restored this withered hand? There could be no collusion here; the man who had a real disease was instantaneously and therefore miraculously cured; and the mercy and power of God were both amply manifested in this business.

    It is worthy of remark, that as the man was healed with a word, without even a touch, the Sabbath was unbroken, even according to their most rigid interpretation of the letter of the law.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 12:13

    Then saith he to the man, Stretch forth thine hand - This was a remarkable commandment.

    The man might have said that he had no strength - that it was a thing which he could not do. Yet, "being commanded," it was his duty to obey. He did so, and was healed. So the sinner. It is his duty to obey whatever God commands. He will give strength to those who endeavor to do his will. It is not right to plead, when God commands us to do a thing, that we have no strength. He will give us strength, if there is a disposition to obey. At the same time, however, this passage should not be applied to the sinner as if it proved that he has no more strength or ability than the man who had the withered hand. It proves no such thing: it has no reference to any such case. It may be used to prove that man should instantly obey the commands of God, without pausing to examine the question about his ability, and especially without saying "that he can do nothing." What would the Saviour have said to this man if he had objected that he could not stretch out his hand?

    It was restored whole - Christ had before claimed divine authority and power Matthew 12:6-9, he now showed that he possessed it. By his "own power" he healed him, thus evincing by a miracle that his claim of being Lord of the Sabbath was well founded.

    These two cases determine what may be done on the Sabbath. The one was a case of "necessity," the other of "mercy." The example of the Saviour, and his explanations, show that these are a part of the proper duties of that holy day. Beyond an "honest" and "conscientious" discharge of these two duties, people may not devote the Sabbath to any secular purpose. If they do, they do it at their peril. They go beyond what His authority authorizes them to do. They do what he claimed the special right of doing, as being Lord of the Sabbath. They usurp His place, and act and legislate where God only has a right to act land legislate. People may as well trample down any other law of the Bible as that respecting the Sabbath.