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Matthew 12:3

    Matthew 12:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But he said unto them, Have ye not read what David did, when he was an hungred, and they that were with him;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But he said to them, Have you not read what David did, when he was an hungered, and they that were with him;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But he said unto them, Have ye not read what David did, when he was hungry, and they that were with him;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But he said to them, Have you no knowledge of what David did when he had need of food, and those who were with him?

    Webster's Revision

    But he said unto them, Have ye not read what David did, when he was hungry, and they that were with him;

    World English Bible

    But he said to them, "Haven't you read what David did, when he was hungry, and those who were with him;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But he said unto them, Have ye not read what David did, when he was an hungred, and they that were with him;

    Definitions for Matthew 12:3

    Hungred - To have been hungry.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 12:3

    Have ye not read what David did - The original history is in 1 Samuel 21:1-6.

    When he was an hungered - Here hearken to Kimchi, producing the opinion of the ancients concerning this story in these words: "Our rabbins of blessed memory say, that he gave him the shew-bread, etc. The interpretation also of the clause, Yea, though it were sanctified this day in the vessel, is this: It is a small thing to say, that it is lawful for us to eat These Loaves, taken from before the Lord, when we are hungry; for it would be lawful to eat this very loaf which is now set on, which is also sanctified in the vessel, (for the table sanctifieth), it would be lawful to eat even this, when another loaf is not present with you to give us, and we are so hunger-bitten. And a little after, There is nothing which may hinder taking care of life, beside idolatry, adultery, and murder. That is, a man, according to them, should do any thing but these in order to preserve life." See Lightfoot.

    He entered into the house of God - Viz. the house of Ahimelech the priest, who dwelt at Nob, with whom the tabernacle then was, in which the Divine presence was manifested.

    And did eat the shew - bread - Τους αρτους της προθεσεως - in Hebrew, לחם פנים lechem panim - bread of the presence, or faces, because this bread was to be set continually, לפני יהוה lipney Yehovah, before the face of Jehovah. See the notes on Exodus 25:23, Exodus 25:30.

    "Since part of the frankincense put in the bread was to be burnt on the altar for a memorial, Leviticus 24:7, and since Aaron and his sons were to eat it in the holy place, it is evident that this bread typified Christ, first presented as a sacrifice to, or in the presence of, Jehovah, and then becoming spiritual food to such as, in and through him, are spiritual priests to God. See Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10; Revelation 20:6; also 1 Peter 2:5." Parkhurst.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 12:3

    But he said unto them ... - To vindicate his disciples, he referred them to a similar case, recorded in the Old Testament, and therefore one with which they ought to have been acquainted. This was the case of David. The law commanded that twelve loaves of bread should be laid on the table in the holy place in the tabernacle, to remain a week, and then to be eaten by the "priests only." Their place was then supplied by fresh "bread." This was called the "showbread," Leviticus 24:5-9. David, fleeing before Saul, weary and hungry, had come to Ahimelech the priest; had found only this bread; had asked it of him, and had eaten it contrary to the "letter" of the law, 1 Samuel 21:1-7. David, among the Jews, had high authority. This act had passed uncondemned. It proved that in "cases of necessity the laws did not bind a man" - a principle which all laws admit. So the "necessity" of the disciples justified them in doing on the Sabbath what would have been otherwise unlawful.

    Wesley's Notes on Matthew 12:3

    12:3 Have ye not read what David did - And necessity was a sufficient plea for his transgressing the law in a higher instance.