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Matthew 23:7

    Matthew 23:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And greetings in the markets, and to be called of men, Rabbi, Rabbi.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And greetings in the markets, and to be called of men, Rabbi, Rabbi.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and the salutations in the marketplaces, and to be called of men, Rabbi.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And words of respect in the market-places, and to be named by men, Teacher.

    Webster's Revision

    and the salutations in the marketplaces, and to be called of men, Rabbi.

    World English Bible

    the salutations in the marketplaces, and to be called 'Rabbi, Rabbi' by men.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and the salutations in the marketplaces, and to be called of men, Rabbi.

    Definitions for Matthew 23:7

    Rabbi - Teacher; master.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 23:7

    To be called of men, Rabbi, Rabbi - רבי רבי, i.e. My teacher! my teacher! The second rabbi is omitted by several excellent MSS., by most of the ancient versions, and by some of the fathers. Griesbach has left it in the text, with the note of doubtfulness.

    There are three words used among the Jews as titles of dignity, which they apply to their doctors - Rabh, Rabbi, and Rabban; each of these terms has its particular meaning: rabban implies much more than rabbi, and rabbi much more than rabh.

    They may be considered as three degrees of comparison: rabh great, rabbi greater, and rabban greatest. These rabbins were looked up to as infallible oracles in religious matters, and usurped not only the place of the law, but of God himself.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 23:7

    Greetings in the markets - Markets were places where multitudes of people were assembled together. They were pleased with special attention in public places, and desired that all should show them particular respect.

    Greetings - Salutations. See the notes at Luke 10:4.

    To be called Rabbi, Rabbi - This word literally signifies great. It was a title given to eminent teachers of the law among the Jews; a title of honor and dignity, denoting authority and ability to teach. They were gratified with such titles, and wished it given to themselves as denoting superiority. Every time it was given to them it implied their superiority to the persons who used it, and they were fond, therefore, of hearing it often applied to them. There were three titles in use among the Jews - Rab, Rabbi, and Rabban - denoting different degrees of learning and ability, as literary degrees do among us.