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Matthew 24:22

    Matthew 24:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And except those days should be shortened, there should no flesh be saved: but for the elect's sake those days shall be shortened.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And except those days should be shortened, there should no flesh be saved: but for the elect's sake those days shall be shortened.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And except those days had been shortened, no flesh would have been saved: but for the elect's sake those days shall be shortened.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And if those days had not been made short there would have been no salvation for any, but because of the saints those days will be made short.

    Webster's Revision

    And except those days had been shortened, no flesh would have been saved: but for the elect's sake those days shall be shortened.

    World English Bible

    Unless those days had been shortened, no flesh would have been saved. But for the sake of the chosen ones, those days will be shortened.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And except those days had been shortened, no flesh would have been saved: but for the elect's sake those days shall be shortened.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 24:22

    Except those days should be shortened - Josephus computes the number of those who perished in the siege at eleven hundred thousand, besides those who were slain in other places, War, b. vi. c. 9; and if the Romans had gone on destroying in this manner, the whole nation of the Jews would, in a short time, have been entirely extirpated; but, for the sake of the elect, the Jews, that they might not be utterly destroyed, and for the Christians particularly, the days were shortened. These, partly through the fury of the zealots on one hand, and the hatred of the Romans on the other; and partly through the difficulty of subsisting in the mountains without houses or provisions, would in all probability have been all destroyed, either by the sword or famine, if the days had not been shortened. The besieged themselves helped to shorten those days by their divisions and mutual slaughters; and by fatally deserting their strong holds, where they never could have been subdued, but by famine alone. So well fortified was Jerusalem, and so well provided to stand a siege, that the enemy without could not have prevailed, had it not been for the factions and seditions within. When Titus was viewing the fortifications after the taking of the city, he could not help ascribing his success to God. "We have fought," said he, "with God on our side; and it is God who pulled the Jews out of these strong holds: for what could machines or the hands of men avail against such towers as these?" War, b. vi. c. 9.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 24:22

    Except those days should be shortened - If the calamities of the siege should be lengthened out. If famine and war should be suffered to rage.

    No flesh be saved - None of the nation would be preserved alive. All the inhabitants of Judea would perish. The war, famine, and pestilence would entirely destroy them.

    But for the elect's sake - The "elect" here doubtless means "Christians." See 1 Peter 1:2; Romans 1:7; Ephesians 1:4; 1 Thessalonians 1:4. The word "elect" means "to choose." It is given to Christians because they are "chosen to salvation through sanctification of the Spirit and belief of the truth," 1 Peter 1:2. It is probable that in Jerusalem and the adjacent parts of Judea there were many who were true followers of Christ. On their account - to preserve them alive, and to make them the instruments of spreading the gospel Jesus said that those days should not be lengthened out so as to produce their destruction. It is related by Josephus (Jewish Wars, b. 1 chapter 12, section 1) that Titus at first resolved to reduce the city by famine. He therefore built a wall around it to keep any provisions from being carried in, and any of the people from going out. The Jews, however, drew up their army near the walls, engaged in battle, and the Romans pursued them, provoked by their attempts, and broke into the city. The affairs of Rome, also, at that time demanded the presence of Titus there; and, contrary to his original intention he pressed the siege and took the city by storm, thus "shortening" the time that would have been occupied in reducing it by famine. This was for the benefit of the "elect." So the designs of wicked people, intended by them for the destruction of the people of God, are intended by God for the good of his chosen people. See the notes at Isaiah 10:7.