Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Matthew 25:15

    Matthew 25:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one; to every man according to his several ability; and straightway took his journey.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And to one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one; to every man according to his several ability; and straightway took his journey.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one; to each according to his several ability; and he went on his journey.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And to one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one; to everyone as he was able; and he went on his journey.

    Webster's Revision

    And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one; to each according to his several ability; and he went on his journey.

    World English Bible

    To one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one; to each according to his own ability. Then he went on his journey.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one; to each according to his several ability; and he went on his journey.

    Definitions for Matthew 25:15

    Straightway - Immediately.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 25:15

    Unto one he gave five talents - to every man according to his several ability - The duties men are called to perform are suited to their situations, and the talents they receive. The good that any man has he has received from God, as also the ability to improve that good. God's graces and temporal mercies are suited to the power which a man has of improving them. To give eminent gifts to persons incapable of properly improving them, would be only to lead into a snare. The talent which each man has suits his own state best; and it is only pride and insanity which lead him to desire and envy the graces and talents of another. Five talents would be too much for some men: one talent would be too little. He who receives much, must make proportionate improvement; and, from him who has received little, the improvement only of that little will be required. As five talents, in one case, are sufficient to answer the purpose for which they were given; so also are two and one.

    The man who improves the grace he has received, however small, will as surely get to the kingdom of God, as he who has received most from his master, and improved all.

    There is a parable something like this in Sohar Chadash, fol. 47: "A certain king gave a deposit to three of his servants: the first kept it; the second lost it; the third spoiled one part of it, and gave the rest to another to keep. After some time, the king came and demanded the deposit. Him who had preserved it, the king praised, and made him governor of his house. Him who had lost it, he delivered to utter destruction, so that both his name and his possessions were blotted out. To the third, who had spoiled a part and given the rest to another to keep, the king said, Keep him, and let him not go out of my house, till we see what the other shall do to whom he has entrusted a part: if he shall make a proper use of it, this man shall be restored to liberty; if not, he also shall be punished." See Schoettgen. I have had already occasion to remark how greatly every Jewish parable is improved that comes through the hands of Christ.

    In this parable of our Lord, four things may be considered: -

    I. The master who distributes the talents.

    II. The servants who improved their talents.

    III. The servant who buried his talent. And

    IV. His punishment.

    I. The master who distributes the talents.

    1. The master's kindness. The servants had nothing - deserved nothing - had no claim on their master, yet he, in his Kindness, delivers unto them his goods, not for his advantage, but for their comfort and salvation.

    2. The master distributes these goods diversely; - giving to one five, to another, two, and to another one. No person can complain that he has been forgotten; the master gives to each. None can complain of the diversity of the gifts; it is the master who has done it. The master has an absolute right over his own goods, and the servants cannot find fault with the distribution. He who has little should not envy him who has received much, for he has the greater labor, and the greater account to give. He who has much should not despise him who has little, for the sovereign master has made the distinction; and his little, suited to the ability which God has given him, and fitted to the place in which God's providence has fixed him, is sufficiently calculated to answer the purpose of the master, in the salvation of the servant's soul.

    3. The master distributes his talents with Wisdom. He gave to each according to his several ability, i.e. to the power he had to improve what was given. It would not be just to make a servant responsible for what he is naturally incapable of managing; and it would not be proper to give more than could be improved. The powers which men have, God has given; and as he best knows the extent of these powers, so he suits his graces and blessings to them in the most wise, and effectual way. Though he may make one vessel for honor, (i.e. a more honorable place or office), and another for dishonor, (a less honorable office), yet both are for the master's use - both are appointed and capacitated to show forth his glory.

    II. The servants who improved their talents.

    These persons are termed δουλοι, slaves, such as were the property of the master, who might dispose of them as he pleased. Then he that had received the five talents went and traded, Matthew 25:16.

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 25:15

    Five talents - See the notes at Matthew 18:24. The word "talents" here is used to denote indefinitely "a large sum," and is designed to refer to the endowments conferred on people. We have retained in our language the word "talent" as referring to the abilities or gifts of men.

    According to his several ability - According to the ability of each one. According as he saw each one was adapted to improve it. So in the church and the world. God gives people stations which he judges them adapted to fill, and requires them to fill them. He makes "distinctions" among people in regard to abilities, and in the powers and opportunities of usefulness, requiring them only to occupy those stations, and to discharge their duties there, 1 Corinthians 4:7.

    Wesley's Notes on Matthew 25:15

    25:15 To one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one - And who knows whether (all circumstances considered) there be a greater disproportion than this, in the talents of those who have received the most, and those who have received the fewest? According to his own ability - The words may be translated more literally, according to his own mighty power. And immediately took his journey - To heaven.