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Matthew 27:23

    Matthew 27:23 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the governor said, Why, what evil hath he done? But they cried out the more, saying, Let him be crucified.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the governor said, Why, what evil has he done? But they cried out the more, saying, Let him be crucified.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And he said, Why, what evil hath he done? But they cried out exceedingly, saying, Let him be crucified.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And he said, Why, what evil has he done? But they gave loud cries, saying, To the cross with him!

    Webster's Revision

    And he said, Why, what evil hath he done? But they cried out exceedingly, saying, Let him be crucified.

    World English Bible

    But the governor said, "Why? What evil has he done?" But they cried out exceedingly, saying, "Let him be crucified!"

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And he said, Why, what evil hath he done? But they cried out exceedingly, saying, Let him be crucified.

    Definitions for Matthew 27:23

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 27:23

    What evil hath he done? - Pilate plainly saw that there was nothing laid to his charge for which, consistently with the Roman laws, he could condemn him.

    But they cried out the more - What strange fury and injustice! They could not answer Pilate's question, What evil hath he done? He had done none, and they knew he had done none; but they are determined on his death.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 27:23

    And the governor said, Why? - Luke informs us that Pilate put this question to them "three times," so anxious was he to release him.

    He affirmed that he had found no cause of death in him. He said, therefore, that he would chastise him and let him go. He expected, probably, by causing him to be publicly whipped, to excite their compassion, to satisfy "them," and thus to evade the demands of the priests, and to set him at liberty with the consent of the people. So weak and irresolute was this Roman governor! Satisfied of his innocence, he should at once have preferred "justice to popularity," and acted as became a magistrate in acquitting the innocent.

    Let him be crucified - See the notes at Matthew 27:39. Luke says they were instant with loud voices demanding this. They urged it. They demanded it with a popular clamor.