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Matthew 7:3

    Matthew 7:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And why behold you the mote that is in your brother's eye, but consider not the beam that is in your own eye?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And why do you take note of the grain of dust in your brother's eye, but take no note of the bit of wood which is in your eye?

    Webster's Revision

    And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?

    World English Bible

    Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye, but don't consider the beam that is in your own eye?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?

    Definitions for Matthew 7:3

    Mote - A small dry particle.

    Clarke's Commentary on Matthew 7:3

    And why beholdest thou the mote - Καρφος might be translated the splinter: for splinter bears some analogy to beam, but mote does not. I should prefer this word (which has been adopted by some learned men) on the authority of Hesychius, who is a host in such matters; Καρφος, κεραια ξυλου λεπτη, Karphos is a thin piece of wood, a splinter. It often happens that the faults which we consider as of the first enormity in others are, to our own iniquities, as a chip is, when compared to a large beam. On one side, self-love blinds us to ourselves; and, on the other, envy and malice give us piercing eyes in respect of others. When we shall have as much zeal to correct ourselves, as we have inclination to reprove and correct others, we shall know our own defects better than now we know those of our neighbor. There is a caution very similar to this of our Lord given by a heathen: -

    Cum tua praevideas oculis mala lippus inunctis:

    Cur in amicorum vitiis tam cernis acutum,

    Quam aut aquila, aut serpens Epidaurius?

    Hor. Sat. lib. 1. sat. 3. l. 25-27

    "When you can so readily overlook your own wickedness, why are you more clear-sighted than the eagle or serpent of Epidaurus, in spying out the failings of your friends?"

    But the saying was very common among the Jews, as may be seen in Lightfoot.

    Barnes' Notes on Matthew 7:3

    And why beholdest thou the mote ... - A mote signifies any "light substance," as dry chaff, or fine spires of grass or grain. It probably most usually signified the small "spiculae" or "beards" on a head of barley or wheat. It is thus placed in opposition to the word "beam."

    Beam - The word used here signifies a large piece of squared timber. The one is an exceedingly small object, the other a large one. The meaning is, that "we are much more quick and acute to judge of small offences in others, than of much larger offences in ourselves." Even a very "small" object in the eye of another we discern much more quickly than a much larger one in our own; a small fault in our neighbor we see much more readily than a large one in ourselves. This was also a proverb in frequent use among the Jews, and the same sentiment was common among the Greeks, and deserves to be expressed in every language.

    Wesley's Notes on Matthew 7:3

    7:3 In particular, why do you open your eyes to any fault of your brother, while you yourself are guilty of a much greater? The mote - The word properly signifies a splinter or shiver of wood. This and a beam, its opposite, were proverbially used by the Jews, to denote, the one, small infirmities, the other, gross, palpable faults. Luke 6:41.