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Numbers 21:27

    Numbers 21:27 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Wherefore they that speak in proverbs say, Come into Heshbon, let the city of Sihon be built and prepared:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Why they that speak in proverbs say, Come into Heshbon, let the city of Sihon be built and prepared:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Wherefore they that speak in proverbs say, Come ye to Heshbon; Let the city of Sihon be built and established:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So the makers of wise sayings say, Come to Heshbon, building up the town of Sihon and making it strong:

    Webster's Revision

    Wherefore they that speak in proverbs say, Come ye to Heshbon; Let the city of Sihon be built and established:

    World English Bible

    Therefore those who speak in proverbs say, "Come to Heshbon. Let the city of Sihon be built and established;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Wherefore they that speak in proverbs say, Come ye to Heshbon, Let the city of Sihon be built and established:

    Definitions for Numbers 21:27

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.
    Wherefore - Why?; for what reason?; for what cause?

    Clarke's Commentary on Numbers 21:27

    They that speak in proverbs - המשלים hammoshelim, from משל mashal, to rule, to exercise authority; hence a weighty proverbial saying, because admitted as an axiom for the government of life. The moshelim of the ancient Asiatics were the same, in all probability, as the Poetae among the Greeks and Latins, the shaara among the Arabs, who were esteemed as Divine persons, and who had their name from shaara, he knew, understood; whose poems celebrated past transactions, and especially those which concerned the military history of their nation. These poets were also termed sahebi deewan, companions or lords of the council of state, because their weighty sayings and universal knowledge were held in the highest repute. Similar to these were the bards among the ancient Druids, and the Sennachies among the ancient Celtic inhabitants of these nations.

    The ode from the 27th to the 30th verse is composed of three parts. The first takes in Numbers 21:27 and Numbers 21:28; the second Numbers 21:29; and the third Numbers 21:30.

    The first records with bitter irony the late insults of Sihon and his subjects over the conquered Moabites.

    The second expresses the compassion of the Israelites over the desolations of Moab, with a bitter sarcasm against their god Chemosh, who had abandoned his votaries in their distress, or was not able to rescue them out of the hands of their enemies.

    The third sets forth the revenge taken by Israel upon the whole country of Sihon, from Heshbon to Dibon, and from Nophah even to Medeba. See Isaiah 15:1, Isaiah 15:2.

    The whole poem, divided into its proper hemistichs, as it stands in Kennicott's Hebrew Bible, is as follows: -

    Verse 27. Part I

    Come ye to Heshbon, let it be rebuilt;

    The city of Sihon, let it be established.

    Verse 28

    For from Heshbon the fire went out,

    And a flame from the city of Sihon:

    It hath consumed the city of Moab,

    With the lords of the heights of Arnon.

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Numbers 21:27

    They that speak in proverbs - The original word is almost equivalent to "the poets." The word supplies the title of the Book of Proverbs itself; and is used of the parable proper in Ezekiel 17:2; of the prophecies of Balsam in Numbers 23:7-10; Numbers 24:3-9; etc.; and of a song of triumph over Babylon in Isaiah 14:4.