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Philippians 3:7

    Philippians 3:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Howbeit what things were gain to me, these have I counted loss for Christ.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But those things which were profit to me, I gave up for Christ.

    Webster's Revision

    Howbeit what things were gain to me, these have I counted loss for Christ.

    World English Bible

    However, what things were gain to me, these have I counted loss for Christ.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Howbeit what things were gain to me, these have I counted loss for Christ.

    Clarke's Commentary on Philippians 3:7

    But what things were gain - The credit and respect which I had, as being zealously attached to the law, and to the traditions of the elders, I counted loss for Christ - I saw that this could stand me in no stead; that all my acts of righteousness were nothing on which I could depend for salvation; and that Christ crucified could alone profit me; for I found that it is impossible that the blood of bulls and goats could take away sin.

    Barnes' Notes on Philippians 3:7

    But what things were gain to me - The advantages of birth, of education, and of external conformity to the law. "I thought these to be gain - that is, to be of vast advantage in the matter of salvation. I valued myself on these things, and supposed that I was rich in all that pertained to moral character and to religion." Perhaps, also, he refers to these things as laying the foundation of a hope of future advancement in honor and in wealth in this world. They commended him to the rulers of the nation; they opened before him a brilliant prospect of distinction; they made it certain that he could rise to posts of honor and of office, and could easily gratify all the aspirings of his ambition.

    Those I counted loss - "I now regard them all as so much loss. They were really a disadvantage - a hindrance - an injury. I look upon them, not as gain or an advantage, but as an obstacle to my salvation." He had relied on them. He had been led by these things to an improper estimate of his own character, and he had been thus hindered from embracing the true religion. He says, therefore, that he now renounced all dependence on them; that he esteemed them not as contributing to his salvation, but, so far as any reliance should be placed on them, as in fact so much loss.

    For Christ - Greek, "On account of Christ." That is, so far as Christ and his religion were concerned, they were to be regarded as worthless. In order to obtain salvation by him, it was necessary to renounce all dependence on these things.

    Wesley's Notes on Philippians 3:7

    3:7 But all these things, which I then accounted gain, which were once my confidence, my glory, and joy, those, ever since I have believed, I have accounted loss, nothing worth in comparison of Christ.