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Proverbs 13:8

    Proverbs 13:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The ransom of a man's life are his riches: but the poor heareth not rebuke.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The ransom of a man's life are his riches: but the poor hears not rebuke.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The ransom of a man's life is his riches; But the poor heareth no threatening.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    A man will give his wealth in exchange for his life; but the poor will not give ear to sharp words.

    Webster's Revision

    The ransom of a man's life is his riches; But the poor heareth no threatening.

    World English Bible

    The ransom of a man's life is his riches, but the poor hear no threats.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The ransom of a man's life is his riches: but the poor heareth no threatening.

    Definitions for Proverbs 13:8

    Rebuke - To reprimand; strongly warn; restrain.

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 13:8

    The ransom of a man's life - Those who have riches have often much trouble with them; as they had much trouble to get them, so they have much trouble to keep them. In despotic countries, a rich man is often accused of some capital crime, and to save his life, though he may be quite innocent, is obliged to give up his riches; but the poor, in such countries, are put to no trouble.

    Barnes' Notes on Proverbs 13:8

    On the one side is the seeming advantage of wealth. The rich man who gets out of many troubles often escapes from a just retribution by his money. But then the poor man in his turn is free from the risk of the threats and litigation that beset the rich. He "hears no rebuke" (the words are not used as in Proverbs 13:1) just as the dead "hear not the voice of the oppressor" Job 3:18 or the abuse of the envious.

    Wesley's Notes on Proverbs 13:8

    13:8 Riches - Riches enable a man to redeem his life when it is in greatest danger, and poverty preserves a man from many injuries. Because they are cautious, that they may not provoke others; and because they are esteemed objects of pity.