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Proverbs 18:19

    Proverbs 18:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    A brother offended is harder to be won than a strong city: and their contentions are like the bars of a castle.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    A brother offended is harder to be won than a strong city: and their contentions are like the bars of a castle.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    A brother offended is harder to be won than a strong city; And'such contentions are like the bars of a castle.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    A brother wounded is like a strong town, and violent acts are like a locked tower.

    Webster's Revision

    A brother offended is harder to be won than a strong city; And'such contentions are like the bars of a castle.

    World English Bible

    A brother offended is more difficult than a fortified city; and disputes are like the bars of a castle.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    A brother offended is harder to be won than a strong city: and such contentions are like the bars of a castle.

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 18:19

    A brother offended is harder to be won than a strong city - Almost all the versions agree in the following reading: "A brother assisted by a brother, is like a fortified city; and their decisions are like the bars of a city." Coverdale is both plain and terse: "The unitie of brethren is stronger then a castell, and they that holde together are like the barre of a palace." The fable of the dying father, his sons, and the bundle of faggots, illustrates this proverb. Unity among brethren makes them invincible; small things grow great by concord. If we take the words according to the common version, we see them express what, alas! we know to be too generally true: that when brothers fall out, it is with extreme difficulty that they can be reconciled. And fraternal enmities are generally strong and inveterate.

    Barnes' Notes on Proverbs 18:19

    The meaning of the first clause is obtained in the King James Version by the insertion of the words in italics, and it seems on the whole to be the best. The Septuagint and Vulgate give an entirely different rendering, based, apparently, upon a different text.