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Proverbs 25:11

    Proverbs 25:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    A word fitly spoken Is like apples of gold in network of silver.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    A word at the right time is like apples of gold in a network of silver.

    Webster's Revision

    A word fitly spoken Is like apples of gold in network of silver.

    World English Bible

    A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in settings of silver.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in baskets of silver.

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 25:11

    A word fitly spoken - על אפניו al ophannaiv, upon its wheels. An observation, caution, reproof, or advice, that comes in naturally, runs smoothly along, is not forced nor dragged in, that appears to be without design, to rise out of the conversation, and though particularly relative to one point, will appear to the company to suit all.

    Is like apples of gold in pictures of silver - - Is like the refreshing orange or beautiful citron, served up in open work or filigree baskets, made of silver. The Asiatics excel in filigree silver work. I have seen much of it, and it is exquisitely beautiful. The silver wire by which it is done they form into the appearance of numerous flowers; and though these wires are soldered everywhere at their junctions with each other, yet this is done with such delicacy and skill as to be scarcely perceptible. I have seen animals formed on this filigree work, with all their limbs, and every joint in its natural play. Fruit-baskets are made also in this way, and are exquisitely fine. The wise man seems to have this kind of work particularly in view; and the contrast of the golden yellow fruit in the exquisitely wrought silver basket, which may be all termed picture work, has a fine and pleasing effect upon the eye, as the contained fruit has upon the palate at an entertainment in a sultry climate. So the word spoken judiciously and opportunely is as much in its place, as the golden apples in the silver baskets.

    Barnes' Notes on Proverbs 25:11

    Apples of gold - Probably the golden colored fruit set in baskets (i. e., chased vessels of open worked silver); so is a word spoken upon its wheels (i. e., moving quickly and quietly on its way). The proverb may have had its origin in some kingly gift to the son of David, the work of Tyrian artists, like Hiram and his fellows. Others gazed on the cunning work and admired, but the wise king saw in the costly rarity a parable of something higher. "A word well set upon the wheels of speech" excelled it. Ornamentation of this kind in the precious metals was known, even as late as in the middle ages, as oeuvre de Salomon.

    Wesley's Notes on Proverbs 25:11

    25:11 Of silver - Which it seems was usual in those times, and was grateful to the eye for the beauty and variety both of the colours and figures, the golden apples appearing through net - work of silver.