Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Proverbs 25:7

    Proverbs 25:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For better it is that it be said unto thee, Come up hither; than that thou shouldest be put lower in the presence of the prince whom thine eyes have seen.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For better it is that it be said to you, Come up here; than that you should be put lower in the presence of the prince whom your eyes have seen.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For better is it that it be said unto thee, Come up hither, Than that thou shouldest be put lower in the presence of the prince, Whom thine eyes have seen.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For it is better to have it said to you, Come up here; than for you to be put down in a lower place before the ruler.

    Webster's Revision

    For better is it that it be said unto thee, Come up hither, Than that thou shouldest be put lower in the presence of the prince, Whom thine eyes have seen.

    World English Bible

    for it is better that it be said to you, "Come up here," than that you should be put lower in the presence of the prince, whom your eyes have seen.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For better is it that it be said unto thee, Come up hither; than that thou shouldest be put lower in the presence of the prince, whom thine eyes have seen.

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 25:7

    Come up hither - Our Lord refers to this, see Luke 14:8 (note), and the notes there. Be humble; affect not high things; let those who are desperate climb dangerous precipices; keep thyself quiet, and thou shalt live at ease, and in peace. Hear the speech of a wise heathen on this subject: -

    Quid fuit, ut tutas agitaret Daedalus alas;Icarus immensas nomine signet aquas?

    Nempe quod hic alte, dimissus ille volabat.Nam pennas ambo nonne habuere suas?

    Crede mihi; bene qui latuit, bene vixit; et infraFortunam debet quisque manere suam.

    Vive sine invidia; mollesque inglorius annosExige: amicitias et tibi junge pares.

    Ovid, Trist. lib. iii., El. 4, ver. 21.

    "Why was it that Daedalus winged his way safely, while Icarus his son fell, and gave name to the Icarian sea? Was it not because the son flew aloft, and the father skimmed the ground? For both were furnished with the same kind of wings. Take my word for it, that he who lives privately lives safely; and every one should live within his own income. Envy no man; pray for a quiet life, though it should not be dignified. Seek a friend, and associate with thy equals."