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Proverbs 27:5

    Proverbs 27:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Open rebuke is better than secret love.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Open rebuke is better than secret love.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Better is open rebuke Than love that is hidden.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Better is open protest than love kept secret.

    Webster's Revision

    Better is open rebuke Than love that is hidden.

    World English Bible

    Better is open rebuke than hidden love.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Better is open rebuke than love that is hidden.

    Definitions for Proverbs 27:5

    Rebuke - To reprimand; strongly warn; restrain.

    Clarke's Commentary on Proverbs 27:5

    Open rebuke is better than secret love - Plutarch gives an account of a man who, aiming a blow at his enemy's life, cut open an imposthume, which by a salutary discharge saved his life, that was sinking under a disease for which a remedy could not be found. Partial friendship covers faults; envy, malice, and revenge, will exhibit, heighten, and even multiply them. The former conceals us from ourselves; the latter shows us the worst part of our character. Thus we are taught the necessity of amendment and correction. In this sense open rebuke is better than secret love. Yet it is a rough medicine, and none can desire it. But the genuine open-hearted friend may be intended, who tells you your faults freely but conceals them from all others; hence the sixth verse: "Faithful are the wounds of a friend."

    Barnes' Notes on Proverbs 27:5

    Secret love - Better, love that is hidden; i. e., love which never shows itself in this one way of rebuking faults. Rebuke, whether from friend or foe, is better than such love.

    Wesley's Notes on Proverbs 27:5

    27:5 Open - When it is needful, in which case, though it put a man to some shame yet it doth him good. Better - More desirable and beneficial. Secret love - Which does not shew itself by friendly actions, and particularly by free and faithful reproof.