Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Psalms 102:24

    Psalms 102:24 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I said, O my God, take me not away in the midst of my days: thy years are throughout all generations.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I said, O my God, take me not away in the middle of my days: your years are throughout all generations.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I said, O my God, take me not away in the midst of my days: Thy years are throughout all generations.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I will say, O my God, take me not away before my time; your years go on through all generations:

    Webster's Revision

    I said, O my God, take me not away in the midst of my days: Thy years are throughout all generations.

    World English Bible

    I said, "My God, don't take me away in the midst of my days. Your years are throughout all generations.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I said, O my God, take me not away in the midst of my days: thy years are throughout all generations.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 102:24

    I said, O my God - This and the following verses seem to be the form of prayer which the captives used previously to their deliverance.

    Thy years are throughout all generations - This was a frequent argument used to induce God to hear prayer. We are frail and perishing; thou art everlasting: deliver us, and we will glorify thee.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 102:24

    I said, O my God, take me not away in the midst of my days - This was the burden of my prayer, for this I earnestly pleaded. See Psalm 30:9; Isaiah 38:1-3, Isaiah 38:9-18. The word used here means "to cause to ascend or go up" and the expression might have been translated, "Cause me not to ascend." The Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate render it, "Call me not away." Dr. Horsley," Carry me not off." In the word there may be an allusion - an obscure one, it is to be admitted - to the idea that the soul ascends to God when the body dies. The common idea in the Old Testament is that it would descend to the regions of the departed spirits - to Sheol. It is plain, however, that there was another idea - that the soul would ascend at once to God when death occurred. Compare Ecclesiastes 3:21; Ecclesiastes 12:7. The word rendered "in the midst" means properly in the half; as if life were divided into two portions. Compare Psalm 55:23.

    Thy years are throughout all generations - Thou dost not die; thou art ever the same, though the generations of people are cut off. This seems to have been said here for two reasons:

    (1) As a ground of consolation, that God was ever the same; that whatever might happen to people, to the psalmist himself, or to any other man, God was unchanged, and that his great plans would be carried forward and accomplished;

    (2) As a reason for the prayer. God was eternal. He had an immortal existence. He could not die. He knew, in its perfection, the blessedness of "life" - life as such; life continued; life unending. The psalmist appeals to what God himself enjoyed - as a reason why life - so great a blessing - should be granted to him a little longer. By all that there was of blessedness in the life of God, the psalmist prays that that which was in itself - even in the case of God - so valuable, might yet a little longer be continued to "him."

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 102:24

    102:24 I said - Do not wholly destroy thy people Israel. In the midst - Before they come to a full possession of thy promises and especially of that fundamental promise of the Messiah. Thy years - Though we die, yet thou art the everlasting God.