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Psalms 106:40

    Psalms 106:40 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Therefore was the wrath of the LORD kindled against his people, insomuch that he abhorred his own inheritance.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Therefore was the wrath of the LORD kindled against his people, so that he abhorred his own inheritance.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Therefore was the wrath of Jehovah kindled against his people, And he abhorred his inheritance.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then the wrath of the Lord was burning against his people, and he was angry with his heritage.

    Webster's Revision

    Therefore was the wrath of Jehovah kindled against his people, And he abhorred his inheritance.

    World English Bible

    Therefore Yahweh burned with anger against his people. He abhorred his inheritance.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Therefore was the wrath of the LORD kindled against his people, and he abhorred his inheritance.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 106:40

    Therefore was the wrath of the Lord kindled - God kindled a fire in his judgments for those who by their flagitious conduct had inflamed themselves with their idols, and the impure rites with which they were worshipped.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 106:40

    Therefore was the wrath of the Lord kindled against his people - Anger is often compared with a fire; as we say now, a man is "inflamed" with passion. See Esther 1:12; Lamentations 2:3; Psalm 79:5; Psalm 89:46; Jeremiah 4:4; Judges 2:14. Of course, this must be taken in a manner appropriate to God. It means that his treatment of his offending people was as if he were burning with wrath against them.

    Insomuch that he abhorred his own inheritance - He was offended with his people; he treated them "as if" they were an abomination to him. He punished them; he cast them off; he left them to the just results of their own conduct. Were ever any writers more candid and honest than the sacred penmen? There is no effort to vindicate the nation; there is no apology offered for them; there is no concealment of their guilt; there is no attempt to soften the statement in regard to the feelings of God toward them. Their conduct was abominable; they deserved the divine displeasure; they were ungrateful, evil, and rebellious; and the sacred writers do not hesitate to admit the truth of this to the fullest extent.