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Psalms 114:5

    Psalms 114:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    What ailed thee, O thou sea, that thou fleddest? thou Jordan, that thou wast driven back?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    What ailed you, O you sea, that you fled? you Jordan, that you were driven back?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    What aileth thee, O thou sea, that thou fleest? Thou Jordan, that thou turnest back?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    What was wrong with you, O sea, that you went in flight? O Jordan, that you were turned back?

    Webster's Revision

    What aileth thee, O thou sea, that thou fleest? Thou Jordan, that thou turnest back?

    World English Bible

    What was it, you sea, that you fled? You Jordan, that you turned back?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    What aileth thee, O thou sea, that thou fleest? thou Jordan, that thou turnest back?

    Definitions for Psalms 114:5

    Sea - Large basin.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 114:5

    What ailed thee, O thou sea - The original is very abrupt; and the prosopopoeia, or personification very fine and expressive: -

    What to thee, O sea, that thou fleddest away!

    O Jordan, that thou didst roll back!

    Ye mountains, that ye leaped like rams!

    And ye hills, like the young of the fold!

    After these very sublime interrogations, God appears; and the psalmist proceeds as if answering his own questions: -

    At the appearance of the Lord, O earth, thou didst tremble;

    At the appearance of the strong God of Jacob.

    Converting the rock into a pool of waters;

    The granite into water springs.

    I know the present Hebrew text reads חולי chuli, "tremble thou," in the imperative; but almost all the Versions understood the word in past tense, and read as if the psalmist was answering his own questions, as stated in the translation above. "Tremble thou, O earth." As if he had said, Thou mayest well tremble, O earth, at the presence of the Lord, at the presence of the God of Jacob.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 114:5

    What ailed thee, O thou sea, that thou fleddest?... - literally, "What to thee, O sea," etc. That is, What influenced thee - what alarmed thee - what put thee into such fear, and caused such consternation? Instead of stating the cause or reason why they were thus thrown into dismay, the psalmist uses the language of surprise, as if these inanimate objects had been smitten with sudden terror, and as if it were proper to ask an explanation from themselves in regard to conduct that seemed so strange.