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Psalms 118:27

    Psalms 118:27 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    God is the LORD, which hath shewed us light: bind the sacrifice with cords, even unto the horns of the altar.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    God is the LORD, which has showed us light: bind the sacrifice with cords, even to the horns of the altar.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Jehovah is God, and he hath given us light: Bind the sacrifice with cords, even unto the horns of the altar.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The Lord is God, and he has given us light; let the holy dance be ordered with branches, even up to the horns of the altar.

    Webster's Revision

    Jehovah is God, and he hath given us light: Bind the sacrifice with cords, even unto the horns of the altar.

    World English Bible

    Yahweh is God, and he has given us light. Bind the sacrifice with cords, even to the horns of the altar.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The LORD is God, and he hath given us light: bind the sacrifice with cords, even unto the horns of the altar.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 118:27

    God is the Lord - Rather אל יהוה El Yehovah, the strong God Jehovah.

    Which hath showed us light - ויאר לנו vaiyaer lanu, "And he will illuminate us." Perhaps at this time a Divine splendor shone upon the whole procession; a proof of God's approbation.

    Bind the sacrifice with cords - The Chaldee paraphrases this verse thus: "Samuel the prophet said, Bind the little one with chains for a solemn sacrifice, until ye have sacrificed him and sprinkled his blood on the horns of the altar." It is supposed that the words refer to the feast of tabernacles, and חג chag here means the festival victim. Several translate the original "keep the festival with thick boughs of the horns of the altar." In this sense the Vulgate and Septuagint understood the passage. David in this entry into the temple was a type of our blessed Lord, who made a similar entry, as related Matthew 21:8-10.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 118:27

    God is the Lord - Still the language of the priests in their official capacity. The meaning here seems to be "God is Yahweh;" or, Jehovah is the true God. It is an utterance of the priesthood in regard to the great truth which they were appointed specifically to maintain - that Yahweh is the true God, and that he only is to be worshipped. This truth it was appropriate to enunciate on all occasions; and it was especially appropriate to be enunciated when a prince, who had been rescued from danger and death, came, as the restored leader of the people of God, to acknowledge his gracious intervention. On such an occasion - in view of the rank and character of him who came - and in view of what God had done for him - it was proper for the ministers of religion to announce in the most solemn manner, that Yahweh was the only true and living God.

    Which hath showed us light - Who has given us light in the days of our darkness and adversity; who has restored us to prosperity, and bestowed on us the blessings of safety and of peace.

    Bind the sacrifice with cords - Come freely with the sacrificial victim; with the offering which is to be presented to God in sacrifice. The word - חג châg - commonly means a festival or feast, Exodus 10:9; Exodus 12:14; and then it means a festival-sacrifice, a victim, Exodus 23:18; Malachi 2:3. The Septuagint and Vulgate render it, "Prepare a solemn feast." Our translation probably expresses the true sense. The word rendered cords, means properly anything interwoven or interlaced. Then it means a cord, a braid, a wreath; and then a branch with thick foliage. Different interpretations have been given of the passage here, but probably the word is correctly rendered cords.

    Unto the horns of the altar - altars were often made with projections or "horns" on the four corners. Exodus 27:2; Exodus 30:2; Exodus 37:25; 1 Kings 2:28. Whether the animal was actually bound to the altar when it was slain, is not certain; but there would seem to be an allusion to such a custom here. Lead up the victim; make it ready; bind it even to the altar, preparatory to the sacrifice. The language is that of welcome addressed to him who led up the victim - meaning that his sacrifice would be acceptable.