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Psalms 125:1

    Psalms 125:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    They that trust in the LORD shall be as mount Zion, which cannot be removed, but abideth for ever.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    They that trust in the LORD shall be as mount Zion, which cannot be removed, but stays for ever.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    They that trust in Jehovah Are as mount Zion, which cannot be moved, but abideth for ever.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    <A Song of the going up.> Those whose hope is in the Lord are like the mountain of Zion, which may not be moved, but keeps its place for ever.

    Webster's Revision

    They that trust in Jehovah Are as mount Zion, which cannot be moved, but abideth for ever.

    World English Bible

    Those who trust in Yahweh are as Mount Zion, which can't be moved, but remains forever.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    A Song of Ascents. They that trust in the LORD are as mount Zion, which cannot be moved, but abideth for ever.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 125:1

    They that trust in the Lord - Every faithful Jew who confides in Jehovah shall stand, in those open and secret attacks of the enemies of God and truth, as unshaken as Mount Zion; and shall not be moved by the power of any adversary.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 125:1

    They that trust in the Lord - His people; his friends. It is, and has been always, a characteristic of the people of God that they trust or confide in him.

    Shall be as mount Zion - The mountain which David fortified, and on which the city was at first built, 2 Samuel 5:6-9. The name Zion became also the name by which the entire city was known.

    Which cannot be removed, but abideth for ever - A mountain is an emblem of firmness and stability; and it is natural to speak of it as that which could not be removed. There is something more than this, however, intended here, as there is some ground of comparison especially in regard to Mount Zion. This must have been either the idea that Zion was particularly strong by position, or that it was under the divine protection, and was therefore safe. Most probably it refers to Zion as a place secure by nature, and rendered more so by art.