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Psalms 130:6

    Psalms 130:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    My soul waiteth for the Lord more than they that watch for the morning: I say, more than they that watch for the morning.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    My soul waits for the Lord more than they that watch for the morning: I say, more than they that watch for the morning.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    My soul waiteth for the Lord More than watchmen wait for the morning; Yea, more than watchmen for the morning.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    My soul is watching for the Lord more than those who are watching for the morning; yes, more than the watchers for the morning.

    Webster's Revision

    My soul waiteth for the Lord More than watchmen wait for the morning; Yea, more than watchmen for the morning.

    World English Bible

    My soul longs for the Lord more than watchmen long for the morning; more than watchmen for the morning.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    My soul looketh for the Lord, more than watchmen look for the morning; yea, more than watchmen for the morning.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 130:6

    More than they that watch for the morning - I believe the original should be read differently from what it is here. The Chaldee has, "More than they who observe the morning watches, that they may offer the morning oblation." This gives a good sense, and is, perhaps, the true meaning. Most of the Versions have "From the morning to the night watches." Or the passage may be rendered, "My soul waiteth for the Lord from the morning watches to the morning watches." That is, "I wait both day and night."

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 130:6

    My soul waiteth for the Lord more than they that watch for the morning - More intently; more anxiously. The Septuagint and Latin Vulgate render this, "My soul hopeth in the Lord from the morning watch until night." The idea is that of watchers - night guards - who look anxiously for the break of day that they may be relieved. It is not that of persons who simply look for the return of day, but of those who are on guard - or it may be who watch beside the sick or the dying - and who look out on the east to mark the first indications of returning light. To them the night seems long; they are weary, and want repose; all around is cheerless, gloomy, and still; and they long for the first signs that light will again visit the world. Thus in affliction - the long, dark, dreary, gloomy night of sorrow - the sufferer looks for the first indication, the first faint ray of comfort to the soul. Thus under deep conviction for sin, and deep apprehension of the wrath of God - that night, dark, dreary, gloomy, often long - the soul looks for some ray of comfort, some intimation that God will be merciful, and will speak peace and pardon.

    I say, more than they that watch for the morning - Margin, which watch unto the morning. The translation in the text best expresses the sense. There is something exceedingly beautiful and touching in this language of repetition, though it is much enfeebled by the words which our translators have inserted, "I say, more than." The Hebrew is, "more than they that watch for the morning - watch for the morning," as if the mind dwelt upon the words as better expressing its own anxious state than any other words could do. Everyone who has been afflicted will feel the force of this; every one who has been under conviction of sin, and who has felt himself in danger of suffering the wrath of God, will remember how anxiously he longed for mercy, for light, for peace, for some indication, even the most faint, like the first ray which breaks in the east, that his soul would find mercy and peace.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 130:6

    130:6 They - Whether soldiers that keep the night - watches in an army, or the priests or Levites who did so in the temple.