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Psalms 137:5

    Psalms 137:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    If I forget you, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, Let my right hand forget her skill .

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    If I keep not your memory, O Jerusalem, let not my right hand keep the memory of its art.

    Webster's Revision

    If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, Let my right hand forget her skill .

    World English Bible

    If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand forget its skill.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning.

    Definitions for Psalms 137:5

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 137:5

    If I forget thee, O Jerusalem - Such conduct would be, in effect, a renunciation of our land a tacit acknowledgment that we were reconciled to our bondage; a concession that we were pleased with our captivity, and could profane holy ordinances by using them as means of sport or pastime to the heathen. No: Jerusalem! we remember thee and thy Divine ordinances: and especially thy King and our God, whose indignation we must bear, because we have sinned against him.

    Let my right hand forget - Let me forget the use of my right hand. Let me forget that which is dearest and most profitable to me; and let me lose my skill in the management of my harp, if I ever prostitute it to please the ungodly multitude or the enemies of my Creator!

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 137:5

    If I forget thee, O Jerusalem - The meaning here is, that to sing in such circumstances would seem to imply that they had forgotten Jerusalem; that they were unmindful of its sorrows, and cared not that it was desolate. The remembrance of its calamities pressed hard upon them, and they could not do anything which would seem to imply that they had become unmindful of the sufferings that had come upon their nation. One will not make merry when a wife or child lies dying - or on the day of the funeral - or over the grave of a mother. A joyous and brilliant party, accompanied with music, feasting, dancing, when a friend has been just laid in the grave, when the calamities of war are abroad, when the pestilence is raging in a city, we feel to be untimely, unseemly, and incongruous. So these captives said it would be if they should make merry while their temple was in ruins; while their city was desolate; while their people were captives in a foreign land.

    Let my right hand forget her cunning - Let my right hand forget its skill in music - all its skill. If I should now play on the harp - as indicative of joy - let the hand which would be employed in sweeping over its strings become paralyzed and powerless. Let the punishment come where it would seem to be deserved - on the hand which could play at such a time. So Cranmer held the hand which had been employed in signing a recantation of his faith in the fire, until it was burned off, and dropped in the flames.