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Psalms 44:20

    Psalms 44:20 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    If we have forgotten the name of our God, or stretched out our hands to a strange god;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    If we have forgotten the name of our God, or stretched out our hands to a strange god;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    If we have forgotten the name of our God, Or spread forth our hands to a strange god;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    If the name of our God has gone out of our minds, or if our hands have been stretched out to a strange god,

    Webster's Revision

    If we have forgotten the name of our God, Or spread forth our hands to a strange god;

    World English Bible

    If we have forgotten the name of our God, or spread forth our hands to a strange god;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    If we have forgotten the name of our God, or spread forth our hands to a strange god;

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 44:20

    If we have forgotten the name of our God - That name, יהוה Jehovah, by which the true God was particularly distinguished, and which implied the exclusion of all other objects of adoration.

    Or stretched out our hands - Made supplication; offered prayer or adoration to any strange god - a god that we had not known, nor had been acknowledged by our fathers. It has already been remarked, that from the time of the Babylonish captivity the Jews never relapsed into idolatry. It was customary among the ancients, while praying, to stretch out their hands towards the heavens, or the image they were worshipping, as if they expected to receive the favor they were asking.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 44:20

    If we have forgotten the name of our God - That is, if we have apostatized from him.

    Or stretched out our hands to a strange god - Or have been guilty of idolatry. The act of stretching out the hands, or spreading forth the hands, was significant of worship or prayer: 1 Kings 8:22; 2 Chronicles 6:12-13; see the notes at Isaiah 1:15. The idea here is, that this was not the cause or reason of their calamities; that if this had occurred, it would have been a sufficient reason for what had taken place; but that no such cause actually existed, and therefore the reason must be found in something else. It was the fact of such calamities having come upon the nation when no such cause existed, that perplexed the author of the psalm, and led to the conclusion in his own mind Psalm 44:22 that these calamities were produced by the malignant designs of the enemies of the true religion, and that, instead of their suffering for their national sins, they were really martyrs in the cause of God, and were suffering for his sake.