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Psalms 46:5

    Psalms 46:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God shall help her, and that right early.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    God is in the middle of her; she shall not be moved: God shall help her, and that right early.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God will help her, and that right early.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    God has taken his place in her; she will not be moved: he will come to her help at the dawn of morning.

    Webster's Revision

    God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God will help her, and that right early.

    World English Bible

    God is in her midst. She shall not be moved. God will help her at dawn.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God shall help her, and that right early.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 46:5

    God is in the midst of her - God will not abandon them that trust in him; he will maintain his own cause; and, if his Church should at any time be attacked, he will help her and that right early - with the utmost speed. As soon as the onset is made, God is there to resist. As by the day-break the shadows and darkness are dissipated; so by the bright rising of Jehovah, the darkness of adversity shall be scattered.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 46:5

    God is in the midst of her - God is in the midst of the "city" referred to above - the "city of God." That is,

    (a) he dwelt there by the visible symbol of his presence, the Shekinah;

    (b) he was there "actually" as a help and a protector.

    It was his chosen abode, and as long as such a Being dwelt in the city, they had nothing to fear.

    God shall help her - That is, in her danger, he will interpose to save her. This is language such as would be used in reference to a place that was besieged, and would well apply to the state of things when Jerusalem was besieged by the armies of Assyria under Sennacherib. The language expresses the confidence of the people in the time of the impending danger.

    And that right early - Margin, "when the morning appeareth." Literally, "in the faces of the morning," as the word is commonly used; or, more literally, in the "turning" of the morning - for the verb from which the word is derived means properly "to turn," and then "to turn to or from any one." The noun is applied to the face or countenance, because the person is "turned" to us when we see his countenance. The poetic idea here seems to refer to the day as having turned away "from" us at night, and then as turning about "toward" us in the morning, after having gone, as it were, to the greatest distance from us. "Possibly" there may be an allusion here to what occurred in the camp of the Assyrians, when the discovery that the angel of the Lord had smitten them was made early in the morning, or when men arose in the morning: "The angel of the Lord went forth, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians an hundred and fourscore and five thousand: and when they arose in the morning" (that is, when men arose in the morning), "behold, they were all dead corpses," Isaiah 37:36.