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Psalms 49:15

    Psalms 49:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But God will redeem my soul from the power of the grave: for he shall receive me. Selah.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But God will redeem my soul from the power of the grave: for he shall receive me. Selah.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But God will redeem my soul from the power of Sheol; For he will receive me. Selah

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But God will get back my soul; for he will take me from the power of death. (Selah.)

    Webster's Revision

    But God will redeem my soul from the power of Sheol; For he will receive me. Selah

    World English Bible

    But God will redeem my soul from the power of Sheol, for he will receive me. Selah.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But God will redeem my soul from the power of Sheol: for he shall receive me. Selah

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 49:15

    But God will redeem my soul from the power of the grave - מיד שאול miyad sheol, "from the hand of sheol." That is, by the plainest construction, I shall have a resurrection from the dead, and an entrance into his glory; and death shall have no dominion over me.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 49:15

    But God will redeem my soul from the power of the grave - literally, "from the hand of Sheol;" that is, from the dominion of death. The hand is an emblem of power, and it here means that death or Sheol holds the dominion over all those who are in the grave. The control is absolute and unlimited. The grave or Sheol is here personified as if reigning there, or setting up an empire there. Compare the notes at Isaiah 14:9. On the word "redeem," see the references in the notes at Psalm 49:7.

    For he shall receive me - literally, "he shall take me." That is, either, He will take me from the grave; or, He will take me "to" himself. The general idea is, that God would take hold of him, and save him from the dominion of the grave; from that power which death exercises over the dead. This would either mean that he would be preserved from going down to the grave and returning to corruption there; or, that he would hereafter be rescued from the power of the grave in a sense which would not apply in respect to the rich man. The former evidently cannot be the idea, since the psalmist could not hope to escape death; yet there might be a hope that the dominion of death would not be permanent and enduring, or that there would be a future life, a resurrection from the grave. It seems to me, therefore, that this passage, like the expression in Psalm 49:14, "in the morning," and the passages referred to in the notes at that verse, is founded on the belief that death is not the end of a good man, but that he will rise again, and live in a higher and better state. It was this consideration which gave such comfort to the psalmist in contemplating the whole subject; and the idea, thus illustrated, is substantially the same as that stated by the Saviour in Matthew 10:28, "Fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul."