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Psalms 8:7

    Psalms 8:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    All sheep and oxen, yes, and the beasts of the field;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    All sheep and oxen, Yea, and the beasts of the field,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    All sheep and oxen, and all the beasts of the field;

    Webster's Revision

    All sheep and oxen, Yea, and the beasts of the field,

    World English Bible

    All sheep and cattle, yes, and the animals of the field,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field;

    Definitions for Psalms 8:7

    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 8:7

    All sheep and oxen - All domestic animals, and those to be employed in agriculture.

    Beasts of the field - All wild beasts, and inhabitants of the forest.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 8:7

    All sheep and oxen - Flocks and herds. Genesis 1:26, "over the cattle." Nothing is more manifest than the control which man exercises over flocks and herds - making them subservient to his use, and obedient to his will.

    And the beasts of the field - Those not included in the general phrase "sheep and oxen." The word rendered "field," שׂדה śâdeh - or the poetic form, as here - שׂדי śâday, means properly a plain; a level tract of country; then, a field, or a tilled farm, Genesis 23:17; Genesis 47:20-21,; and then the fields, the open country, as opposed to a city, a village, a camp Genesis 25:27; and hence, in this place the expression means the beasts that roam at large - wild beasts, Genesis 2:20; Genesis 3:14. Here the allusion is to the power which man has of subduing the wild beasts; of capturing them, and making them subservient to his purposes; of preventing their increase and their depredations; and of taming them so that they shall obey his will, and become his servants. Nothing is more remarkable than this, and nothing furnishcs a better illustration of Scripture than the conformity of this with the declaration Genesis 9:2, "And the fear of you, and the dread of you, shall be upon every beast of the earth, and upon every fowl of the air," etc. Compare the notes at James 3:7. It is to be remembered that no small number of what are now domestic animals were originally wild, and that they have been subdued and tamed by the power anti skill of man. No animal has shown himself superior to this power and skill.