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Psalms 80:19

    Psalms 80:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Turn us again, O LORD God of hosts, cause thy face to shine; and we shall be saved.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Turn us again, O LORD God of hosts, cause your face to shine; and we shall be saved.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Turn us again, O Jehovah God of hosts; Cause thy face to shine, and we shall be saved.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Take us back, O Lord God of armies; let us see the shining of your face, and let us be safe.

    Webster's Revision

    Turn us again, O Jehovah God of hosts; Cause thy face to shine, and we shall be saved.

    World English Bible

    Turn us again, Yahweh God of Armies. Cause your face to shine, and we will be saved. For the Chief Musician. On an instrument of Gath. By Asaph.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Turn us again, O LORD God of hosts; cause thy face to shine, and we shall be saved;

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 80:19

    Turn as again - Redeem us from this captivity.

    O Lord God of hosts - Thou who hast all power in heaven and earth, the innumerable hosts of both worlds being at thy command.

    Cause thy face to shine - Let us know that thou art reconciled to us. Let us once more enjoy thy approbation. Smile upon thy poor rebels, weary of their sins, and prostrate at thy feet, imploring mercy.

    And we shall be saved - From the power and oppression of the Chaldeans, from the guilt and condemnation of our sins, and from thy wrath and everlasting displeasure. Thus, O God, save Us!

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 80:19

    Turn us again, O Lord God of hosts ... - See Psalm 80:3, note; Psalm 80:7, note; Psalm 80:14, note. This is the sum and the burden of the psalm. The repetition of the prayer shows the earnestness of the people, and their conviction that their only hope in their troubles was that God would interpose and bring them back again; that he would be favorable to them, and lift upon them the light of his countenance. So with all. In our backslidings, our afflictions, and our troubles, our only hope is that God will bring us back to himself; our proper place is at the throne of mercy; our pleadings should be urgent, earnest, and constant, that he will interpose and have mercy on us; our solemn purpose - our expressed and recorded pledge - should be that if we are restored to God, we will wander no more. But, alas! how much easier it is to say this than to do it; how much easier to promise than to perform; how much easier to pledge ourselves when we are in affliction that if the troubles are removed we will be faithful, than it is to carry out such a purpose when the days of prosperity return, and we are again surrounded by the blessings of health and of peace. If all people - even good people - kept the vows which they make, the world would be comparatively a pure and happy world; if the church itself would only carry out its own solemn pledges, it would indeed arise and shine, and the world would soon be filled with light and salvation.