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Romans 12:18

    Romans 12:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    If it be possible, as much as lieth in you, live peaceably with all men.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    If it be possible, as much as lies in you, live peaceably with all men.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    If it be possible, as much as in you lieth, be at peace with all men.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    As far as it is possible for you be at peace with all men.

    Webster's Revision

    If it be possible, as much as in you lieth, be at peace with all men.

    World English Bible

    If it is possible, as much as it is up to you, be at peace with all men.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    If it be possible, as much as in you lieth, be at peace with all men.

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 12:18

    If it be possible - To live in a state of peace with one's neighbors, friends, and even family, is often very difficult. But the man who loves God must labor after this, for it is indispensably necessary even for his own sake. A man cannot have broils and misunderstandings with others, without having his own peace very materially disturbed: he must, to be happy, be at peace with all men, whether they will be at peace with him or not. The apostle knew that it would be difficult to get into and maintain such a state of peace, and this his own words amply prove: And if it be possible, as much as lieth in you, live peaceably. Though it be but barely possible, labor after it.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 12:18

    If it be possible - If it can be done. This expression implies that it could not always be done. Still it should be an object of desire; and we should endeavor to obtain it.

    As much as lieth in you - This implies two things:

    (1) We are to do our utmost endeavors to preserve peace, and to appease the anger and malice of others.

    (2) we are not to "begin" or to "originate" a quarrel.

    So far as "we" are concerned, we are to seek peace. But then it does not always depend on us. Others may oppose and persecute us; they will hate religion, and may slander, revile, and otherwise injure us; or they may commence an assault on our persons or property. For "their" assaults we are not answerable; but we are answerable for our conduct toward them; and on no occasion are we to commence a warfare with them. It may not be "possible" to prevent their injuring and opposing us; but it is possible not to begin a contention with them; and "when they" have commenced a strife, to seek peace, and to evince a Christian spirit. This command doubtless extends to everything connected with strife; and means that we are not to "provoke" them to controversy, or to prolong it when it is commenced; see Psalm 34:14; Matthew 5:9, Matthew 5:39-41; Hebrews 12:14. If all Christians would follow this command, if they would never "provoke" to controversy, if they would injure no man by slander or by unfair dealing, if they would compel none to prosecute them in law by lack of punctuality in payment of debts or honesty in business, if they would do nothing to irritate, or to prolong a controversy when it is commenced, it would put an end to no small part of the strife that exists in the world.