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Romans 4:24

    Romans 4:24 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But for us also, to whom it shall be imputed, if we believe on him that raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But for us also, to whom it shall be imputed, if we believe on him that raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    but for our sake also, unto whom it shall be reckoned, who believe on him that raised Jesus our Lord from the dead,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But for us in addition, to whose account it will be put, if we have faith in him who made Jesus our Lord come back again from the dead,

    Webster's Revision

    but for our sake also, unto whom it shall be reckoned, who believe on him that raised Jesus our Lord from the dead,

    World English Bible

    but for our sake also, to whom it will be accounted, who believe in him who raised Jesus, our Lord, from the dead,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    but for our sake also, unto whom it shall be reckoned, who believe on him that raised Jesus our Lord from the dead,

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 4:24

    But for us also - The mention of this circumstance has a much more extensive design than merely to honor Abraham. It is recorded as the model, according to which God will save both Jews and Gentiles: indeed there can be no other way of salvation; as all have sinned, all must either be saved by faith through Christ Jesus, or finally perish. If God, therefore, will our salvation, it must be by faith; and faith contemplates his promise, and his promise comprehends the Son of his love.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 4:24

    But for us also - For our use; (compare Romans 15:4; 1 Corinthians 10:11), that we might have an example of the way in which people may be accepted of God. It is recorded for our encouragement and imitation, to show that we may in a similar manner be accepted and saved.

    If we believe on him ... - Abraham showed his faith in God by believing just what God revealed to him. This was his faith, and it might be as strong and implicit as could be exercised under the fullest revelation. Faith, now, is belief in God just so far as he has revealed his will to us. It is therefore the same in principle, though it may have reference to different objects. It is confidence in the same God, according to what we know of his will. Abraham showed his faith mainly in confiding in the promises of God respecting a numerous posterity. This was the leading truth made known to him, and this he believed.

    (The promise made to Abraham was, "in thy seed shall all nations of the earth be blessed," on which we have the following inspired commentary: "And the scriptures foreseeing that God would justify the pagan through faith, preached before the gospel unto Abraham, saying, In thee shall all nations be blessed," Galatians 3:8. It would seem, then, that this promise, like that made immediately after the fall, contained the very germ and principles of the gospel. So that after all there is not so great difference between the object of Abraham's faith, and that of ours. Indeed the object in both cases is manifestly the same.)

    The main or leading truths that God has made known to us are, that he has given his Son to die; that he has raised him up; and that through him he is ready to pardon. To put confidence in these truths is to believe now. Doing this, we believe in the same God that Abraham did; we evince the same spirit; and thus show that we are the friends of the same God, and may be treated in the same manner. This is faith under the gospel (compare the notes at Mark 16:16), and shows that the faith of Abraham and of all true believers is substantially the same, and is varied only by the difference of the truths made known.

    Wesley's Notes on Romans 4:24

    4:24 But on ours also - To establish us in seeking justification by faith, and not by works; and to afford a full answer to those who say that, to be justified by works means only, by Judaism; to be justified by faith means, by embracing Christianity, that is, the system of doctrines so called. Sure it is that Abraham could not in this sense be justified either by faith or by works; and equally sure that David (taking the words thus) was justified by works, and not by faith. Who raised up Jesus from the dead - As he did in a manner both Abraham and Sarah. If we believe on him who raised up Jesus - God the Father therefore is the proper object of justifying faith. It is observable, that St. Paul here, in speaking both of our faith and of the faith of Abraham, puts a part for the whole. And he mentions that part, with regard to Abraham, which would naturally affect the Jews most.