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Romans 5:3

    Romans 5:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation works patience;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And not only so, but we also rejoice in our tribulations: knowing that tribulation worketh stedfastness;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And not only so, but let us have joy in our troubles: in the knowledge that trouble gives us the power of waiting;

    Webster's Revision

    And not only so, but we also rejoice in our tribulations: knowing that tribulation worketh stedfastness;

    World English Bible

    Not only this, but we also rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering works perseverance;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And not only so, but let us also rejoice in our tribulations: knowing that tribulation worketh patience;

    Clarke's Commentary on Romans 5:3

    And not only so - We are not only happy from being in this state of communion with our God, and the prospect of being eternally with him;

    But we glory in tribulations also - All the sufferings we endure for the testimony of our Lord are so sanctified to us by his grace, that they become powerful instruments of increasing our happiness.

    Tribulation worketh patience - Ὑπομονην, Endurance under trials, without sustaining loss or deterioration. It is a metaphor taken from refining metals. We do not speak thus from any sudden raptures, or extraordinary sensations we may have of spiritual joy: for we find that the tribulations through which we pass are the means of exercising and increasing our patience, our meek forbearance of injuries received, or persecutions experienced, on account of the Gospel.

    Barnes' Notes on Romans 5:3

    And not only so - We not only rejoice in times of prosperity, and of health. Paul proceeds to show that this plan is not less adapted to produce support in trials.

    But we glory - The word used here is the same that is in Romans 5:2, translated, "we rejoice" καυχώμεθα kauchōmetha. It should have been so rendered here. The meaning is, that we rejoice not only in hope; not only in the direct results of justification, in the immediate effect which religion itself produces; but we carry our joy and triumph even into the midst of trials. In accordance with this, our Saviour directed his followers to rejoice in persecutions, Matthew 5:11-12. Compare James 1:2, James 1:12.

    In tribulations - In afflictions. The word used here refers to all kinds of trials which people are called to endure; though it is possible that Paul referred particularly to the various persecutions and trials which they were called to endure as Christians.

    Knowing - Being assured of this. Paul's assurance might have arisen from reasoning on the nature of religion, and its tendency to produce comfort; or it is more probable that he was speaking here the language of his own experience. He had found it to be so. This was written near the close of his life, and it states the personal experience of a man who endured, perhaps, as much as anyone ever did, in attempting to spread the gospel; and far more than commonly falls to the lot of mankind. Yet he, like all other Christians, could leave his deliberate testimony to the fact that Christianity was sufficient to sustain the soul in its severest trials; see 2 Corinthians 1:3-6; 2 Corinthians 11:24-29; 2 Corinthians 12:9-10.

    Worketh - Produces; the effect of afflictions on the minds of Christians is to make them patient. Sinners are irritated and troubled by them; they complain, and become more and more obstinate and rebellious. They have no sources of consolation; they deem God a hard master; and they become fretful and rebellions just in proportion to the depth and continuance of their trials. But in the mind of a Christian, who regards his Father's hand in it; who sees that he deserves no mercy; who has confidence in the wisdom and goodness of God; who feels that it is necessary for his own good to be afflicted; and who experiences its happy, subduing, and mild effect in restraining his sinful passions, and in weaning him from the world the effect is to produce patience. Accordingly, it will usually be found that those Christians who are longest and most severely afflicted are the most patient. Year after year of suffering produces increased peace and calmness of soul; and at the end of his course the Christian is more willing to be afflicted, and bears his afflictions more calmly, than at the beginning. He who on earth was most afflicted was the most patient of all sufferers; and not less patient when he was "led as a lamb to the slaughter," than when he experienced the first trial in his great work.

    Patience - "A calm temper, which suffers evils without murmuring or discontent" (Webster).

    Verses Related to Romans 5:3

    Proverbs 15:32 - He that refuseth instruction despiseth his own soul: but he that heareth reproof getteth understanding.
    Revelation 3:19 - As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten: be zealous therefore, and repent.
    Proverbs 1:7 - The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction.