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Song Of Solomon 2:7

    Song of Solomon 2:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, and by the hinds of the field, that ye stir not up, nor awake my love, till he please.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I charge you, O you daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, and by the hinds of the field, that you stir not up, nor awake my love, till he please.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, By the roes, or by the hinds of the field, That ye stir not up, nor awake my love, Until he please.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I say to you, O daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes of the field, do not let love be moved till it is ready.

    Webster's Revision

    I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, By the roes, or by the hinds of the field, That ye stir not up, nor awake my love, Until he please.

    World English Bible

    I adjure you, daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, or by the hinds of the field, that you not stir up, nor awaken love, until it so desires.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, and by the hinds of the field, that ye stir not up, nor awaken love, until it please.

    Definitions for Song of Solomon 2:7

    Hinds - Deer or mountain goats.

    Clarke's Commentary on Song of Solomon 2:7

    I charge you - by the roes - This was probably some rustic mode of adjuration. The verses themselves require little comment. With this verse the first night of the first day is supposed to end.

    Barnes' Notes on Song of Solomon 2:7

    Render: "I adjure you ... by the gazelles, or by the hinds of the field, that ye stir not up nor awaken love until it please." The King James Version, "my love," is misleading. The affection or passion in itself, not its object, is here meant. This adjuration, three times significantly introduced as a concluding formula (marginal references), expresses one of the main thoughts of the poem; namely, that genuine love is a shy and gentle affection which dreads intrusion and scrutiny; hence the allusion to the gazelles and hinds, shy and timid creatures.

    The complementary thought is that of Sol 8:6-7, where love is again described, and by the bride, as a fiery principle.