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Titus 2:9

    Titus 2:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Exhort servants to be obedient unto their own masters, and to please them well in all things; not answering again;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Exhort servants to be obedient to their own masters, and to please them well in all things; not answering again;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Exhort'servants to be in subjection to their own masters, and to be well-pleasing to them in all things; not gainsaying;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Servants are to be under the authority of their masters, pleasing them in all things, without argument;

    Webster's Revision

    Exhort'servants to be in subjection to their own masters, and to be well-pleasing to them in all things; not gainsaying;

    World English Bible

    Exhort servants to be in subjection to their own masters, and to be well-pleasing in all things; not contradicting;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Exhort servants to be in subjection to their own masters, and to be well-pleasing to them in all things; not gainsaying;

    Clarke's Commentary on Titus 2:9

    Exhort servants to be obedient - The apostle refers to those who were slaves, and the property of their masters; even these are exhorted to be obedient ιδιοις δεσποταις, to their own despots, though they had no right over them on the ground of natural justice.

    Please them well in all things - They were to endeavor to do this in all things, though they could not hope to succeed in every thing.

    Not answering again - Μη αντιλεγοντας· Not contradicting or gainsaying. This is no part of a servant's duty; a servant is hired to do his master's work, and this his master has a right to appoint.

    Barnes' Notes on Titus 2:9

    Exhort servants to be obedient to their own masters - See this explained in the notes at Ephesians 6:5, following, and 1 Timothy 6:1-4.

    And to please them well in all things - That is, so far as they lawfully may, or in those things which are not contrary to the will of God; compare Ephesians 6:6. It should be an object with one who is a servant, to meet the approbation of his master, as long as this relation continues. This rule would not, however, go to the extent to require him to please his master in doing anything that is contrary to the law of God, or that is morally wrong.

    Not answering again - Margin, "gainsaying." Not contradicting, or not disobeying. They were to do what the master required, if it did not interfere with the rights of conscience, without attempting to argue the matter - without disputing with the master - and without advancing their own opinions. Where this relation exists, no one can doubt that this is a proper frame of mind for a servant. It may be observed, however, that all that is here said would be equally appropriate, whether the servitude was voluntary or involuntary. A man who becomes voluntarily a servant, binds himself to obey his master cheerfully and quietly, without gainsaying, and without attempting to reason the matter with him, or propounding his own opinions, even though they may be much wiser than those of his employer. He makes a contract to obey his master, not to reason with him, or to instruct him.