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Titus 3:9

    Titus 3:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But avoid foolish questions, and genealogies, and contentions, and strivings about the law; for they are unprofitable and vain.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But avoid foolish questions, and genealogies, and contentions, and strivings about the law; for they are unprofitable and vain.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    but shun foolish questionings, and genealogies, and strifes, and fightings about law; for they are unprofitable and vain.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But have nothing to do with foolish questionings, and lists of generations, and fights and arguments about the law; for they are of no profit and foolish.

    Webster's Revision

    but shun foolish questionings, and genealogies, and strifes, and fightings about law; for they are unprofitable and vain.

    World English Bible

    but shun foolish questionings, genealogies, strife, and disputes about the law; for they are unprofitable and vain.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    but shun foolish questionings, and genealogies, and strifes, and fightings about the law; for they are unprofitable and vain.

    Definitions for Titus 3:9

    Vain - Empty; foolish; useless.

    Clarke's Commentary on Titus 3:9

    Avoid foolish questions, and genealogies - In these the Jews particularly delighted; they abounded in the most frivolous questions; and, as they had little piety themselves, they were solicitous to show that they had descended from godly ancestors.

    Of their frivolous questions, and the answers given to them by the wisest and most reputable of their rabbins, the following is a specimen: -

    Rabbi Hillel was asked: Why have the Babylonians round heads? To which he answered: This is a difficult question, but I will tell the reason: Their heads are round because they have but little wit.

    Q. Why are the eyes of the Tarmudians so soft?

    A. Because they inhabit a sandy country.

    Q. Why have the Africans broad feet?

    A. Because they inhabit a marshy country. See more in Schoettgen.

    But ridiculous and trifling as these are, they are little in comparison to those solemnly proposed and most gravely answered by those who are called the schoolmen. Here is a specimen, which I leave the reader to translate: -

    Utrum essent excrementa in Paradiso? Utrum sancti resurgent cum intestinis? Utrum, si deipara fuisset vir, potuisset esse naturalis parens Christi?

    These, with many thousands of others, of equal use to religion and common sense, may be found in their writings. See the Summa of Thomas Aquinas, passim. Might not the Spirit have these religious triflers in view, rather than the less ridiculous Jews? See the notes on 1 Timothy 1:4; 2 Timothy 2:23 (note).

    Contentions, and strivings about the law - Of legal contentions, and different and conflicting decisions about the meaning of particular rites and ceremonies, the Talmud is full.

    Barnes' Notes on Titus 3:9

    But avoid foolish questions and genealogies - See the 1 Timothy 1:4 note; 2 Timothy 2:16, 2 Timothy 2:23 notes.

    And contentions, and strivings about the law - Such as the Jews started about various matters connected with the law - about meats and drinks, etc.; the notes at 1 Timothy 1:4; compare the notes at Acts 18:15.

    For they are unprofitable and vain - - They disturb and embitter the feelings; they lead to the indulgence of a bad spirit; they are often difficult to be settled, and are of no practical importance if they could be determined. The same thing might be said of multitudes of things about which men dispute so earnestly now.